Courses

CLAS 36720 Leo Strauss and Lucretius On the Nature of Things

(SCTH 37323)

I shall discuss Leo Strauss’s “Notes on Lucretius” (1968) and Lucretius’ De rerum natura with a special focus on the relation of philosophy and poetry. H. Meier. Spring.

H. Meier
2020-21 Spring

CLAS 38020 Platonic Aesthetics

(SCTH 35009)

The anachronism of the course title constitutes our program: to what extent can Plato’s thinking about artworks, images, poets in the polis, beauty, the visual world, the senses, subjectivity and criticism be viewed coherently as an aesthetic theory? Does his style and dramatic mode of writing interact significantly with these views? How have they been received, and to what extent are they right?  A. Pop. Winter.

A. Pop
2020-21 Winter

CLAS 40820 Hymns and Sanctuaries in Ancient Greece

(HIST 50300)

This two-quarter seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and Classics, seeks to explore how we might reconstruct the religious experience of the ancient Greeks through texts in translation (especially hymns), inscriptions, and material culture, paying particular attention to issues of methodology. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion, focused on individual sanctuary sites, while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Non-Classics students will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter by arrangement with the instructors. C. Faraone. J. Hall. Autumn.

Prerequisites: None for first quarter of sequence; the second quarter of the sequence is exclusive to Classics graduate students. 

CLAS 40821 Hymns and Sanctuaries in Ancient Greece II

(HIST 50301)

This two-quarter seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and Classics, seeks to explore how we might reconstruct the religious experience of the ancient Greeks through texts in translation (especially hymns), inscriptions, and material culture, paying particular attention to issues of methodology. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion, focused on individual sanctuary sites, while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. C. Faraone. J. Hall. Winter.

Classics graduate students only

CLAS 42020 Seminar: Greek Tragedy and Philosophy

Ancient Greek tragedy has been of continuous interest to philosophers, whether they love it or hate it.  But they do not agree about what it is and does, or about what insights it offers.  This seminar will study the tragic festivals and a select number of tragedies, also consulting some modern studies of ancient Greek tragedy.  Then we shall turn to philosophical accounts of the tragic genre, including those of Plato, Aristotle, the Greek and Roman Stoics (especially Seneca), Lessing, Schlegel, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Iris Murdoch, Sartre, and Bernard Williams. If we have time we will include some study of ancient Greek comedy and its philosophical significance. M. Nussbaum. Autumn. 

Ph.D. students in Philosophy, Classics, and Political Theory may enroll without permission.  Law students with ample philosophical background (an undergraduate degree in Philosophy) are welcome to enroll but should ask Prof. Nussbaum first. Permission must be sought in writing by September 15. Undergraduates may not enroll.

M. Nussbaum
2020-21 Autumn

CLAS 42720 The Return of Migration: Mobility and the New Empiricism

This seminar questions the prerogatives of disciplines in framing and explaining social change via mobility. Following earlier theories of diffusion to understand diachronic cultural change, and the subsequent contextual critiques that privilege historical contingencies and human agency, advances in identifying past human movement through techniques like ancient DNA genome testing have increasingly led to the revival of migration as a subject of focus and explanation. As growing interest in contemporary refugee and forced migration studies is showing, migration represents not just a wide-ranging practice of different types, but is a semantically charged and ambiguous term whose recent applications provide new opportunities to assess its interpretive advantages and limitations. Is the new empirical emphasis on migration re-racializing antiquity? What do we gain by studying concepts of diasporas, transnationalism, and border crossings in the premodern world? Why does migration matter? Divided into two parts, the course covers the conceptual and theoretical work in current literature on migration as well as applications to specific historical problems from ancient and modern Eurasia. (Meeting Fridays from 1:30-4:20pm in JRL TBA Enrollment Limit: 18)

Catherine Kearns, J. Osborne
2020-21 Winter

CLAS 49000 Prospectus Workshop

A workshop for students who have completed coursework and qualifying exams, it aims to provide practical assistance and a collaborative environment for students preparing the dissertation prospectus. It will meet bi-weekly for two quarters. S. Torallas Tovar Autumn, Winter.

2020-21 Autumn

CLCV 23520/CLAS 33520 Pity: What’s the good of it?

(ANCM 43520, BIBL 33520, RLST 23520)

In the Iliad, Andromache famously appealed to her husband Hector to take pity on herself and her infant son, and not go out to fight the Greeks; Hector took pity, but said no. What happened to pity since Homer? Aristotle recognized as an essential feature of tragedy, along with fear. Surprisingly, however, it did not enter Greco-Roman political theory except for one short, little noticed mention: Lucretius placed pity for the weak at the foundation of the Epicurean view of justice. This course will delve into the notion of pity from antiquity to Schopenhauer, with attention to Greeks, Romans, Christians, the period of the Enlightenment, and the Romantics. We will ask: can pity serve as the foundation of morality, as Schopenhauer proposed; or is it shameful, or self-serving?  E. Asmis. Winter.

2020-21 Winter

CLCV 25806/CLAS 35806 The Epigraphy of the Greek World

(HIST 20309/30309)

Following the conquest of Alexander, Greek became the language of power all over the Near East and up to central Asia and India (for a while). Even the fall of the various Greek kingdoms at the end of the Hellenistic period did not mark the end of the habit of writing in Greek. Inscriptions in Greek coming from those regions are still to be found in significant number up to the third century CE. This class will cover all types of inscriptions, from slave manumissions to civic decrees or royal letters, and from  modest epitaphs to sophisticated verse epigrams. It will illustrate the vitality and prestige of Greek culture well beyond the regions close to the Mediterranean Sea.  A good level in Greek is required. A. Bresson.  Winter.

Intermediate-level Greek proficiency or higher

2020-21 Winter

CLCV 26216 Pagans and Christians: Greek Background to Early Christianity

(RLST 20505, MDVL 20505)

This course will examine some of the ancient Greek roots of early Christianity. We will focus on affinities between Christianity and the classical tradition as well as ways in which the Christian faith may be considered radically different from it. Some of the more important issues that we will analyze are: "The spell of Homer." How the Homeric poems exerted immeasurable influence on the religious attitudes and practices of the Greeks. The theme of creation in Greek and Roman authors such as Hesiod and Ovid. The Orphic account of human origins. The early Christian theme of Christ as Creator/Savior. Greek, specifically Homeric conceptions of the afterlife. The response to the Homeric orientation in the form of the great mystery cults of Demeter, Dionysus, and Orpheus. The views of the philosophers (esp. Plato) of the immortality of the soul compared with the New Testament conception of resurrection of the body. Ancient Greek conceptions of sacrifice and the crucifixion of Christ as archetypal sacrifice. The attempted synthesis of Jewish and Greek philosophic thought by Philo of Alexandria and its importance for early Christianity.  D. Martinez. Spring.

2020-21 Spring

CLCV 26620/CLAS 36620 Making the Monsoon: The Ancient Indian Ocean

(HIST 26614/36614, )

The course will explore the human adaptation to a climatic phenomenon and its transformative impacts on the littoral societies of the Indian Ocean, circa 1000 BCE–1000 CE. Monsoon means season, a time and space in which favorable winds made possible the efficient, rapid crossing of thousands of miles of ocean. Its discovery—at different times in different places—resulted in communication and commerce across vast distances at speeds more commonly associated with the industrial than the preindustrial era, as merchants, sailors, religious specialists, and scholars made monsoon crossings. The course will consider the participation of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, South Asian, and East African actors in the making of monsoon worlds and their relations to the Indian Ocean societies they encountered; the course is based on literary and archaeological sources, with attention to recent comparative historiography on oceanic, climatic, and global histories. R. Payne. Autumn.

R. Payne
2020-21 Autumn

CLCV 27116/CLAS 37116 The Greek Countryside

This course explores the historic development and dynamics of the ancient Greek countryside (oikoumene, chora) alongside the emergence of the city (polis). Recent historical analyses of demography and economy, archaeological fieldwork, and research on the cultural lens of town/country are revealing a highly complex world surrounding the city walls. What are the benefits and potential interpretive challenges of investigating these places and their constituent actors? Discussions will question the construction of urban vs. non-urban categories of ancient life, agropastoral economies and markets, political and social boundaries, rural sanctuaries, diachronic change, and methods and theories for examining the countryside through material culture and textual evidence. C. Kearns. Autumn.

2020-21 Autumn

CLCV 27320/CLAS 37320 Greek Archaeology in 20 Objects

This course centers the objects of the ancient Greek world, from prehistory to the Hellenistic period, as avenues for exploring the practice, history, and motivations of the discipline of Greek archaeology. From the mundane to the spectacular, we will closely consider twenty things – pots, statues, coins, knives, bones, inscriptions, among others – whose compelling if fragmentary biographies reveal how archaeologists reconstruct and explain ancient social lives. Discussions will interrogate histories of object analysis, identification, and interpretation; schemes of periodization and categorization; theories of gender, class, economy, politics, and religion; developments in technologies and aesthetics; the intersections of artifact discovery and museum or market acquisitions; and the making of Greek archaeology within the wider discipline.  C. Kearns. Winter.

2020-21 Winter

CLCV 27520 Plutarch's Lives in the History of Political Philosophy

(SCTH 20673)

This course will examine the application of ancient Greek political philosophy to practical activity and individual cases through the study of a number of Plutarch’s Parallel Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans, along with a selection of Plutarch’s sources from philosophy, oratory, and historiography. Discussions will consider Plutarch’s treatment of questions such as “what is justice?”, “do the means justify the ends?” and “what kind of knowledge is required for political virtue?” Readings will fall into three main segments: first, Plutarch’s analysis of the good and the truth with an eye to his reading of Plato and its application to practical politics; second, his account of virtue, especially in relation to Aristotle; and third, his assessment of the Athenian and Spartan regimes, with comparisons of his thought and the writings of Xenophon and Thucydides. In writing assignments, students will engage in the careful interpretation of Plutarch’s text, and reflect on the possibilities and shortcomings of his methods. Interested students may attend translation sessions on selections from course readings in Greek or Latin. K.Weeda. Autumn.

Konrad C. Weeda
2020-21 Autumn

CLCV 27716/CLAS 37716 Exemplary leaders in Machiavelli’s Discourses

(PLSC 27703/47703, FNDL 27716)

Cicero famously called history the “schoolmistress of life.” This course explores how ancient and early modern authors – in particular, Livy, Plutarch and Machiavelli – used the lives and actions of great individuals from the Greek and Roman past to establish models of political behavior for their own day and for posterity. Such figures include Romulus, Brutus, Camillus, Agathocles, Nabis, Cleomenes, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, Julius Caesar, and Augustus. We will consider how their actions are submitted to praise or blame, presented as examples for imitation or avoidance, and examine how the comparisons and contrasts established among the different historical individuals allow new models and norms to emerge. No one figure can provide a definitive model. Illustrious individuals help define values even when we mere mortals cannot aspire to reach their level of virtue or depravity. Course open to undergraduates and graduate students. Readings will be in English. Students wishing to read Latin, Greek, or Italian will receive support from the professors. M. Lowrie, J. McCormick. Winter

Michèle Lowrie, J. McCormick
2020-21 Winter

GREK 36100 Introduction to Papyrology

(BIBL 43300)

This course will concentrate on the methods and perspectives of the discipline of papyrology, including the "hands on" experience of working with photographed and scanned texts of various collections. No previous knowledge of the field is assumed; we will begin from the ground up. Approximately the first six weeks of the course will be devoted to an introduction to the study of papyri, in which our concerns will include the following: 1. transcription and analysis of different paleographic styles, including literary hands and documentary Ptolemaic scripts. 2. extensive reading of edited papyrus texts from the Pestman and Loeb editions and elsewhere; 3. careful attention to the linguistic phenomenon of koine Greek with regard to phonology, morphology, and syntax; how the koine differs from the classical language and the relationship of the idiom of the papyri to that of other koine documents, such as the New Testament; the importance of koine linguistics to textual criticism. 4. investigation of the contribution of papyrology to other areas of the study of antiquity such as literature, social history, linguistics, textual criticism, and religion.

3 years of Greek.

2020-21 Spring

GREK 41220 Sophocles, The Trachinian Women

(SCTH 35991)

A close literary and philological analysis of one of the most remarkable and perplexing of all Greek tragedies. While this has traditionally been one of the most neglected of Sophocles’ tragedies, it is a drama of extraordinary force and beauty and the issues that it explores – husband and wife, parents and child, sexual violence, myth and temporality, divinity and humanity, suffering and transcendence – are ones that are both of permanent interest and of particular relevance to our present concerns. The poetic text, in its many dimensions, will offer more than adequate material for classroom analysis and discussion, but some attention will also be directed to the reception of this play.

PQ: a reading knowledge of ancient Greek or the consent of the instructor; open to graduate students and, with the consent of the instructor, to undergraduates.

Glenn Most
2020-21 Winter

GREK 10100 Introduction to Attic Greek I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the basic rules of Ancient Greek. Course work involves reading practice, presentational writing, and formal study of grammar and vocabulary. Throughout the course, students will encounter authentic Ancient Greek text. Students who complete this course will be able to understand simple sentences, and often to combine them into larger units of meaning. Knowledge of Greek not required.

Staff
2020-21 Autumn

GREK 10123 Summer Intensive Introductory Ancient Greek. 300 Units.

Summer Introductory Ancient Greek comprises a thorough introduction to the Classical Greek language in eight weeks, using the Joint Association of Classical Teachers' Reading Greek (2nd ed.), and supplements from online resources. Through a daily mixture of synchronous and asynchronous activities students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Greek texts, and complete exercises in Greek to gain an active command of the language. In the latter half of the course, students will also read unadapted Greek from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. By the end of the 8 weeks, students will be thoroughly familiar with Classical Greek idiom and sentence structure, and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language.

Staff
2020-21 Summer

GREK 10200 Introduction To Attic Greek II. 100 Units.

This course continues the study of basic Ancient Greek. Course work involves reading practice, presentational writing, and formal study of grammar and vocabulary. Throughout the course, students will encounter authentic Ancient Greek text. Students who complete this course will be able to understand complex sentences, and often to combine them into larger units of meaning.

GREK 10100

2020-21 Winter

GREK 10300 Introduction to Attic Greek III. 100 Units.

This course continues the study of basic Ancient Greek. Course work involves reading practice, presentational writing, and formal study of grammar and vocabulary. Throughout the course, students will encounter authentic Ancient Greek text. Students who complete this course will be able to track ideas across at least a paragraph of text, and will be ready to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

GREK 10200

Staff
2020-21 Spring

GREK 20100 Intermediate Greek I: Plato. 100 Units.

We read Plato's text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax.

GREK 10300, 11300 or equivalent

2020-21 Autumn

GREK 20123 Summer Intensive Intermediate Ancient Greek. 300 Units

Summer Intensive Intermediate Greek combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Greek and for the use of Greek texts in their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important Classical authors, and typically include Plato and Herodotus, Demosthenes or Thucydides. The backbone of the review sessions is Mastronarde's Introduction to Ancient Greek combined with sight reading skill practice. The program combines daily synchronous and asynchronous activities. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation in the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. This course equips students to continue with advanced coursework or independent reading in Ancient Greek in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Greek corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Successful completion of GREK 10300 or the equivalent placement.

Staff
2020-21 Summer

GREK 20200 Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. 100 Units

This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history.

GREK 20100 or equivalent

2020-21 Winter

GREK 20300 Intermediate Greek III. 100 Units

This course is a close reading of selections from Homer, with an emphasis on language, meter, and literary tropes.

GREK 20200 or equivalent

2020-21 Spring

GREK 22417/32417 Greek Comedy: Aristophanes and Menander

(HIST 2/30403, FNDL 22417)

We will read in Greek substantial parts of three of Aristophanes‘ plays and two of Menander’s. We will discuss and analyze various aspects of the evolution of Greek comedy, textual tradition, the language of comedy and its political background. Coursework will include translation as well as secondary readings. S. Torallas Tovar. Spring

GREK 20600 or equivalent

2020-21 Spring

GREK 22515/32515 Greek Historians: Thucydides. 100 Units

In this course we will read book 1 of Thucydides, his description of the run-up to the Peloponnesian War, in Greek. We will pay attention to Thucydides' style and approach to historiography, sinking our teeth into this difficult but endlessly fascinating text.

At least two years of Greek.

2020-21 Winter

GREK 23220/32320 Hellenistic/Imperial Literature. 100 Units

This class will read selections from the poetry of the Hellenistic period, especially the hymns of Callimachus, the pastoral poetry of Theocritus, and the epic parody “The Battle of the Frogs and Mice.” Alongside these Hellenistic texts we will read some of their poetic predecessors (Homer, Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, choral and monadic lyric), with an eye to the Hellenistic poets’ interest in poetic form, self-positioning, and play. E. Austin. Autumn.

GREK 20300 or equivalent

2020-21 Autumn

GREK 23815/33815 The Epistle to the Hebrews and the Epistle of Barnabas

(BIBL 46804)

Tertullian was the first to attribute the authorship of the Epistle to the Hebrews to Barnabas, and that ascription found favor with no less an ancient figure as Jerome, and even with notable scholars of the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries, such as Albrecht Ritschl and Friedrich Blass. Although no one can know who wrote it, there are fruitful literary and thematic parallels between the Epistle that bears the name Barnabas and the canonical Hebrews, including their critique of Judaism and their interpretatio Christiana of the Hebrew Bible, with particular regard to Levitical institutions and the temple. We will read thoroughly the Greek text of each treatise with focus on the language and style of the two texts, their relation to Hellenistic Judaism, and their respective treatments of Hebrew Bible/Septuagintal themes. D. Martinez.  Winter.

2 years of Greek

2020-21 Winter

GREK 29700 Reading Course: Greek. 100 Units

No description available. Terms Offered: Autumn Winter

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

2020-21

LATN 32120 Vergil

(FNDL 21520)

In this course we will read as much as possible of Vergil’s Aeneid in the original, and the rest in translation. Our focus will be on the way the poem interrogates some of its most basic claims about empire, piety, heroism, and history, but we will try to avoid falling into the binary trap of “positive” and “negative” readings of the epic’s relationship to its Roman imperial context.  Requirements: Class presentation; 10 page paper; final.

LATN 20200 or equivalent

2020-21 Winter

LATN 32700 Survey of Latin Literature-I: Prose

Substantial selections are read from Cato, Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Seneca, and Tacitus at a rapid pace, with attention paid to their use of resources of the Latin language and their role in the development of Latin style. S. Bartsch-Zimmer. Winter.

2020-21 Winter

LATN 32800 Survey of Latin Literature I (Poetry)

We shall read extended selections from poetry writers of recognized importance to the Latin tradition. Our sampling of texts will emphasize writers of the Late Republic and Early Principate. D. Wray. Autumn. 

2020-21 Autumn

LATN 34400 Latin Prose Composition

This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students' awareness of the classical artists' skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. M. Lowrie. Spring.

Consent of the Instructor is required. 

2020-21 Spring

LATN 10100 Introduction to Classical Latin I. 100 Units

This course is intended for students with some experience in Latin to quickly review what they know and upgrade their skills in reading and understanding Latin. In this course, students will expand their vocabulary, learn more advanced grammar, and practice extensive reading.

Staff
2020-21 Autumn

LATN 10123 Summer Intensive Introductory Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Introductory Latin offers a comprehensive introduction to Classical Latin language in eight weeks. In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Latin texts, and complete exercises in Latin to gain an active command of the language. Students will also read unadapted Latin from classical authors, including Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero. By the end of the summer Latin course, students will be thoroughly familiar with Latin idiom and sentence structure and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language. Summer Introductory Latin is an intensive course that requires a full-time commitment on the part of the student, meeting approximately five hours per day and demanding independent review and memorization in the evenings.independent review and memorization in the evenings.

Staff
2020-21 Summer

LATN 10200 Introduction to Classical Latin II. 100 Units.

This course continues the study of basic Latin. Course work involves reading Latin, translating from Latin into English and vice versa, and study of grammar and vocabulary. Throughout the course, students will encounter authentic Latin text. Students who complete this course will be able to understand complex sentences, and often to combine them into larger units of meaning.

LATN 10100

Staff
2020-21 Winter

LATN 10300 Introduction to Classical Latin III. 100 Units.

This course continues the study of basic Latin. Course work involves reading Latin, translating from Latin into English and vice versa, and study of grammar and vocabulary. Throughout the course, students will encounter authentic Latin text. Students who complete this course will be able to track ideas across at least a paragraph of text, and will be ready to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

LATN 10200

2020-21 Spring

LATN 11400 Latin for Post Beginners I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students with some experience in Latin to quickly review what they know and upgrade their skills in reading and understanding Latin. In this course, students will expand their vocabulary, learn more advanced grammar, and practice extensive reading. Terms Offered: Summer, Winter

2020-21 Winter

LATN 11500 Latin for Post Beginners II. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students with some experience in Latin to quickly review what they know and upgrade their skills in reading and understanding Latin. In this course, students will expand their vocabulary, learn more advanced grammar, and practice extensive reading.

2020-21 Autumn

LATN 20100 Intermediate Latin I. 100 Units.

Readings concentrate on works of Roman prose (e.g. Cicero), with an aim to improve reading skills, discuss key concepts in Roman history and culture, and study problems of grammar as necessary.

LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent

Staff
2020-21 Autumn

LATN 20123 Summer Intensive Intermediate Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intermediate Latin combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Latin and for the use of Latin texts in the course of their research. Texts studied are taken from one or more representative and important authors, which may include Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and others. The backbone of the review sessions is Wheelock's Latin, with supplementary exercises in composition. The program includes synchronous meetings five days a week as well as daily asynchronous assignments. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation during the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. Summer Intermediate Latin equips students to continue with advanced coursework or independent reading in Latin in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Latin corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Successful completion of LATN 10300 or equivalent placement

2020-21 Summer

LATN 20200 Intermediate Latin II. 100 Units.

Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catalinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. Some discussion of the history and culture of the period; study of problems of grammar as necessary.

LATN 20100 or equivalent

Staff
2020-21 Winter

LATN 20300 Intermediate Latin III. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of selections from a major monument of Roman literature, such as Vergil's Aeneid. There will be discussion of the relationship between language and literary art, and the legacy of the work or works studied.

LATN 20200 or equivalent

2020-21 Spring

LATN 21500/31500 Roman Satire

(FDNL 31500)

We shall read extensively in Latin from the Satires of Juvenal.  We shall focus on language, poetic technique, and understanding the text (also with the help of early Latin-language commentaries).  M. Allen. Spring.

2020-21 Spring

LATN 21600/31600 Roman Oratory: Cicero’s Caesarian Speeches

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–44 BC) was the most accomplished orator of the Roman Republic.  Among the most fascinating of his speeches are the three “Caesarian” speeches delivered to Julius Caesar on behalf of persons who had opposed Caesar in the civil war.  In the speeches Cicero, in many different ways, uses his hard-won rhetorical and literary skills, practiced over a lifetime in lawsuits, political debates, and philosophizing, not merely to speak on behalf of the immediate subjects of the speeches, but also to suggest social and political roles for Caesar himself.  Caesar’s place in the Roman world is as much a topic of the three speeches as the immediate issue of each speech.  The chief purpose of this class is to reach an understanding of the basic issues of each speech and the roles that Cicero scripts for Caesar in them. B. Krostenko. Autumn.

B. Krostenko
2020-21 Autumn

LATN 26100/36100 History of Latin

This course examines the phonological and morphological development of the Latin language from Indo-European to Vulgar Latin.  That development is studied both for its own sake and as a point of departure for introducing linguistic concepts useful for the analysis of other layers of language and of aspects of literary texts.  Discussion of major topics in phonology and morphology will alternate with close examination of sample or otherwise relevant texts and lexical families.  Major topics are: the principles of historical and comparative linguistics; the development of the Latin sound inventory; Latin and its sister languages; the creation of the Latin nominal and verbal systems; (some of) the varieties of classical Latin; and the influence of Greek on Latin. B. Krostenko. Autumn.

B. Krostenko
2020-21 Autumn

LATN 29700 Reading Course. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

2020-21