Jonathan Hall

Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities and Professor in the Departments of History and Classics and the College
Wieboldt 403
Ph.D. University of Cambridge, 1993
Research Interests: Ancient Greek social, cultural, and political history; classical archaeology; historical methodology; modern Greek history.

Jonathan Hall's earlier research was focused on the cultural and social history of ancient Greece, with a particular emphasis on the construction, meaning, and functions of ethnic identity among Greek communities. His first book, Ethnic Identity in Greek Antiquity (Cambridge, 1997), received the 1999 Charles J. Goodwin Award for Merit from the American Philological Association, while Hellenicity: Between Ethnicity and Culture (Chicago, 2002) was the recipient of the 2004 Gordon J. Laing Award from the University of Chicago Press. He has also tackled questions of historical method which are explored in A History of the Archaic Greek World, ca. 1200–479 BCE, 2nd ed. (Chichester, 2014) and Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian (Chicago, 2014). He is currently completing a book on Argos and its archaeological heritage in the modern era. In 2009 he was awarded the Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching.

Recent Publications

  • “The Archaeology of ‘Celebrities’ in the Greek and Roman Worlds,” Acta ad Archaeologiam et Artium Historiam Pertinentia 30 (2018), 310-327.
  • “Hellenic Homelands: The Greek Diaspora, Ancient and Modern,” in L. Nevett and J. Whitley, eds, An Age of Experiment: Classical Archaeology Transformed, 1976-2014 (Cambridge, 2018), 235-246.
  • “Quanto c’è di ‘greco’ nella ‘colonizzazione greca’? In L. Donnellan, V. Nizzo, and G.J. Burgers, eds, Conceptualizing Early Colonization (Brussels, 2016), 51-59.
  • Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian (Chicago, 2014).
  • A History of the Archaic Greek World, ca. 1200-479 BCE, 2nd edn (Chichester, 2014).