Latest News

Michèle Lowrie (Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Classics) has been awarded a 2018-19 fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities, which supports advanced research in the humanities. She hopes to use the fellowship to complete her book project, Security, A Roman Metaphor, which will trace the emergence of the concept of national security in Roman literature and the politics of its trajectory. The Department is delighted to congratulate Professor Lowrie on her receipt of such a competitive and deserved fellowship.

For further information, please click here.


 

The Department is delighted to announce that Fiona Macintosh has accepted an invitation to deliver the 2018-19 Sigmund H. Danziger Jr Distinguished Lecture in Literature on Friday 17 May 2019.

Fiona Macintosh is Professor of Classical Reception and Fellow of St Hilda’s College at the University of Oxford. She is the author of Dying Acts: Death in Ancient Greek and Modern Irish Tragic Drama (1994) and Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus (2009), and is the editor or co-editor of Dionysus Since 69: Greek Tragedy at the Dawn of the Third Millennium (2004), Agamemnon in Performance, 458 BC to AD 2004 (2005), Greek Tragedy and the British Theatre, 1660–1914 (2005), The Ancient Dancer in the Modern World: Responses to Greek and Roman Dance (2010), Choruses, Ancient and Modern (2013), and The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas (2015). Since 2010, she has been the Director of the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama, which maintains a collection of more than 10,000 items related to modern performances of Greek and Roman drama and co-ordinates research into worldwide performances of Greek and Roman drama, in any medium, from antiquity to the present.

Further details will be announced.


 

Christopher A. Faraone (Frank and Gertrude Springer Professor in the Humanities and the College) gave a series of three lectures in Paris in December 2017, on the theme Oracles, Incantations and Lament: The Ritual Hexameters of Women from Homer and Theocritus. For further information and abstracts of the lectures, please click here.


 

Music in Context: Perspectives on Ancient Greek Tragedy and Performance, part-funded by the Department of Classics, took place at the Franke Institute for the Humanities on Friday 27th October and Saturday 28th October. For a full program, click here.


 

Alain Bresson (Robert O. Anderson Distinguished Service Professor of Classics and History) has won the American Historical Association’s James Henry Breasted Prize 2017 for his book The Making of the Ancient Greek Economy: institutions, markets, and growth in the city-states, which was published by Princeton University Press in 2016.

The James Henry Breasted Prize has been awarded annually by the American Historical Association since 1985 to the author of the best English book in any field of history prior to CE 1000. The Prize was instituted in honor of Professor James Henry Breasted, who founded the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago in 1919 and was later president of the American Historical Association.

The Making of the Ancient Greek Economy presents a detailed and innovative picture of the exponential growth of the economy of the ancient Greek world in the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods. Professor Bresson’s receipt of the Prize reflects his status as a leading figure in contemporary debate on the history of the ancient economy, and the Department is delighted to congratulate him.


 

Tragic Pleasure from Homer to Plato, by Rana Saadi Liebert (PhD '12), is now available from Cambridge University Press.

For more information on Rana Saadi Liebert's new book click here!


 

In Memoriam Robert Germany

November 8, 1974 - March 7, 2017

(Ph.D. Chicago 2008), Associate Professor of Classics at Haverford College


 

The Society for Classical Studies has recognized several of our faculty and alumni for their outstanding contributions to the profession.

Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer (Helen A. Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor of Classics and the Program in Gender Studies

The Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit

Shadi is one of three awarded for outstanding contributions to classical scholarship published by members of the SCS for her work Persius: A Study in Food, Philosophy, and the Figural (University of Chicago Press, 2015).

Stacie Raucci (PhD '05)

Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Classics at the College Level 

Stacie is one of three awarded to give special and public expression to the SCS’s commitment to honor and foster excellence in the teaching of classics.

Benjamin Stevens (PhD '05)

Outreach Prize

Awarded for an outstanding project or event by an SCS member or members that makes an aspect of classical antiquity available and attractive to an audience other than classics scholars or students in their courses. Benjamin has been awarded for for his initiative (with Brett Rogers) on classical traditions, science fiction, and fantasy.


 

We are happy to announce that Emily Austin will be joining the department in July 2016. Emily completed her Ph.D at Boston University, where she taught courses on Homeric heroes and the ancient world. Her research interests include Greek literature, especially Homeric epic, emotions, characterization, and communication in ancient literature. She is working on a book, tentatively titled Grief, Anger, and the Iliadic Hero, that explores the emotional motivations of vengeance in the Iliad, identifying a unique and unnoticed link between grief and longing in the poet's description of Achilles’ grief for Patroklos.


 

The Department of Classics announces Emily Mackil as the lecturer for the 2016-17 Classics Lecture Series. She will be delivering a lecture every Tuesday in November at 5:30.

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