Nolan Epstein

Biography and Interests: 

Nolan received his PhD from Stanford in June 2019 and since then has made a nostos back to his alma, Chicago. While completing his BA and MA at UChi, Nolan began a path through archaic Greek poetry that he is still on today. His primary research interests converge at the intersection of word and thing, his dissertation, "Choral Orientations: Spatial Cognition and Geopoetics in Pindar, Bacchylides, and Simonides," being a study of the interrelationship between text and place in celebratory performance. Other research fields include: ancient science (medicine, geography, engineering); digital cartography; comparative literature; political theory (especially Arendt); site-specific performance ancient & modern.

Currently, Nolan is working toward presentations and publications on: i.) the cosmetic and corporal deceptions practiced by slave-dealers as described in untranslated passages of the ancient medical corpus; ii.) men’s hairstyles, the archaic symposium, and the (gendered) embodiment of authorship; iii.) mapping the Pindaric corpus and itineraries of Greek drama. He is also beginning a larger project that is designed as a genealogical survey of words (in Greek, Latin, and European languages) central to contemporary discussions of materiality and object-oriented philosophy.

A Hellenist by training, Nolan has been delighted to have had wide exposure to the teaching of Roman studies in history, language, and cultural sequences.

Outside of classics, Nolan is an audio-cum-cinephile with a wide-ranging vinyl collection and a subscription to one of the last movie rental stores.

Honors, Awards, Fellowships and Grants: 

• 2019 Graduate Teaching Award from Stanford’s Department of Classics for Receiving the Highest Course Evaluation Ratings and Creating an Intellectually Rich Classroom Environment in Classics 14—Greek and Latin Roots of English 

• 2014 Stanford Center for South Asia Language Fellowship (for Sanskrit) 

• 2014 Stanford Department of Classics Language Acquisition Grant (for Sanskrit) 

• 2013 (Alternate) Pearson Fellowship awarded by the American Philological Association

• 2011 John G. Hawthorne Prize awarded by the University of Chicago Department of Classics 

Courses: 

INTENSIVE INTRODUCTORY LATIN (LATN 10123)

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL LATIN I (LATN 10100)

ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN WORLD II: ROME (HIST 20800) [two sections]

INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL LATIN III: CICERO (LATN 10300)

Department: 

Classics Department