Resources

Fikellura

Funding Resources

Ephron Research Scholarship – due date: April 1st

Graduate students in Classics of good academic standing may apply for Ephron Research Scholarships. Formal proposals are due on April 1 of each year for use in the following summer or academic year. These scholarships are available to two kinds of candidates: (1) advanced students, who are beyond the regular five-year funding arrangement and who do not have a dissertation fellowship or equivalent source of funding, can apply for grants of up to $8,000 to cover shortfalls in stipend funding; (2) students in their first five years can apply for research-related expenses for grants of up to $2,000.

Students are asked to submit a letter of application and a CV, together with a list of funding (including the name of fund and amount) received previously at the University of Chicago and expected or sought for the coming year. The letter of application should request a specific amount and explain why this amount is needed. Thesis advisers are asked to send a short note to the secretary of the Department, commenting on the student’s progress on the dissertation.

Boyer Fellowship

The Boyer Fellowship is designed to enable selected students of the Classics Department “to travel abroad in order to gain firsthand knowledge of the people, monuments, inscriptions and manuscripts of the classical lands.” In order for one’s file to be taken into consideration, applicants must first apply for a Ryerson Fellowship in the Humanities Division. The deadline for submitting an application for a Boyer Fellowship is the same as that of the Ryerson Fellowship. Applicants need (1) to send a copy of their Ryerson Fellowship application to the secretary of the Department of Classics, and (2) to mention in a separate letter that they would like to apply for a Boyer Fellowship. The deadline is typically in late Winter.

Graduate Workshops

Library and Research Resources

The library system of the University of Chicago, one of the largest university collections in North America, contains well over 5,000,000 volumes. Classics students may on occasion want to consult holdings in the Oriental Institute, the D'Angelo Law Library, or the John Crerar Library of technology and science, but most books and periodicals dealing with the ancient world are concentrated in the Joseph Regenstein Library.

Classics has been one of the strongest parts of this collection since its first formation in 1891, when the University purchased the entire stock of a collection in Berlin that specialized in classical philology, archaeology, and science. In addition to current monographs, the Library receives more than 700 serials devoted to ancient Greece and Rome. Major editions of classical texts printed from the Renaissance through the 18th century are found in the Department of Special Collections, which also houses collections of Greek and Latin manuscripts and a large reference library devoted to paleography, manuscript catalogs, and facsimiles.

Books not in the University system can generally be obtained quickly through interlibrary loan from the collections at the Center for Research Libraries and the University of Illinois at Urbana. The database of the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae is accessible over the campus network; the Latin texts prepared by the Packard Humanities Institute, the CETEDOC database of ancient and medieval Christian Latin texts, and several other electronic databases useful to the study of the Classics are mounted on workstations in the Classics Reading Room of the Regenstein Library. The Classics Reading Room contains a full collection of Greek and Latin texts and commentaries, as well as the epigraphical collections, other basic resources, and comfortable places to work and study with other classicists.

Computer Resources

The Classics department has a small computer room available to students. The database of the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae is accessible over the campus network, including from this computer room. The Latin texts prepared by the Packard Humanities Institute, the CETEDOC database of ancient and medieval Christian Latin texts, and several other electronic databases useful to the study of the Classics are mounted on workstations in the Classics Reading Room of the Regenstein Library. Also available over the campus computer network are important research tools like the on-line L'Année Philologique and the JSTOR journal collection.

Please see the library's page on classics resources for a full list.

Additional Links