Undergraduate Courses, 2011-2012

Faculty: M. Allen, C. Ando, E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, A. Bresson, H. Dik, C. A. Faraone, J. Hall, M. Lowrie, D. Martinez, E. Mayer, S. Nooter, M. Payne, P. White, D. Wray.

Classical Civilization (CLCV)

Courses designated “Classical Civilization” do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

20400. Who Were the Greeks? (=HIST 20701/30701, CLAS 30400) If the current resurgence of interest in ethnic studies is a direct reflection of a contemporary upsurge in ethnic conflict throughout the world, it remains the case that notions of peoplehood and belonging have been of periodic importance throughout history. This course studies the various expressions of Greek identity within shifting political, social, and cultural contexts from prehistory to the present day, though with a strong emphasis on classical antiquity. Particular attention is given to theoretical issues such as anthropological definitions of ethnicity, the difference between ethnic and cultural identities, methods for studying ethnicity in historical societies, and the intersection of ethnicity with politics. J. Hall. Autumn.

20611. The Achaemenid Persian Empire. (=NEHC 20175) The Achaemenid Persian Empire covered most of the territory of the modern Middle East (including modern-day Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, as well as Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt and Turkey), and ruled these lands for around two hundred years (ca. 550–330 BC). Despite the important role, which Persian Empire held in that time, it is surprisingly poorly known by non-experts. In modern popular culture it is usually associated with Greek struggle against Persians in the 5th century BC (as reflected by numerous books and movies on Persian Wars), as well as with Alexander the Great’s conquests. However, the picture of the Persian Empire in the popular culture is largely distorted by numerous stereotypes and prejudices, an effect of centuries dominated by the Greek-oriented vision of ancient history. Therefore, the popular knowledge on Persian Empire, if any, is usually largely incorrect.

The present course is designed to convey the up-to-date knowledge on the history, culture, and achievements of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. The course is dedicated to undergraduate students without previous knowledge or background in ancient history, or history of the ancient Near East. As one of the goals, the course will deal with stereotypes and incorrect ideas on the Persian Empire, presenting in accessible way the present state of research. After finishing the course, the student should have a basic understanding of the most important events of the Achaemenid period, knowledge of the most important figures connected with its history, as well as familiarity with Achaemenid art and culture. The course will make extensive use of the collection of the Oriental Institute Museum, which has one of the largest collections of the Achaemenid Persian art in the U.S. T. Mikolajczak. Winter.

20700-20800-20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I, II, III. Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter, Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter; or Winter, Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), Autumn Quarter; the Roman Republic (527 to 559 BC), Winter Quarter; and the five centuries between the establishment of imperial autocracy in 27 BC and the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century AD, Spring Quarter.

20700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. (=HIST 16700) This course, which fulfills the Common Core requirement in civilizational studies, surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the making of the political, economic, social and religious structures of the Greek city-states, the Persian Wars, the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians, Alexander’s conquest and finally the new world of the Hellenistic kingdoms in the eastern part of the Mediterranean world. A. Bresson. Autumn.

20800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. (=HIST 16800) This course surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its emergence as a classical city-state in the eighth century BCE to the eve of Christian autocracy in the late third century CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community. C. Ando. Winter.

20900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. (=HIST 16900) This quarter surveys the five centuries between the establishment of imperial autocracy in 27 BC and the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century AD. W. Kaegi. Spring.

21200. History and Theory of Drama I. (=CLAS 31200, CMLT 20500/30500, ENGL 13800/31000, TAPS 28400) May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. This course is a survey of major trends and theatrical accomplishments in Western drama from the ancient Greeks through the Renaissance: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, medieval religious drama, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson, along with some consideration of dramatic theory by Aristotle, Horace, Sir Philip Sidney, and Dryden. The goal is not to develop acting skill but, rather, to discover what is at work in the scene and to write up that process in a somewhat informal report. Students have the option of writing essays or putting on short scenes in cooperation with other members of the class. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended. D. Bevington, H. Coleman. Autumn.

21807. Greek Art & Archaeology. (=ARTH 14107) This course will survey sculpture, painting, and architecture from ancient Greece from the end of the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. In addition to close study of the major works, particular attention will be paid to their cultural context and to key issues such as nudity in art and life, the origins and development of narrative, art and politics, the status and role of the artist, and also to fakes, forgeries and the difficulties of archaeological inference. Wherever possible, newly-discovered artifacts will be given special attention. R. Neer. Winter.

22611. History of Strategy. (=HIST 21900/31900, CLAS 32611) This is a lecture and discussion course on the emergence of and changes in European thinking about strategy and command from the end of antiquity to 1815. Topics include the gradual evolution of European military thinking away from dependence on classical thinking about warfare; relationships between firepower and the character of warfare after the appearance of gunpowder; changing conceptions of strategy, tactics, and generalship; and thinking about warfare, maneuver, and battle. Readings are drawn from classics of military history in historical context. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

22707. Pompeii. (=ARTH 20600/30500, CLAS 32707) Pompeii is an iconic site because of its preservation and excavation history. It is tempting but problematic to treat it as “the” paradigmatic Roman city. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, Pompeii was a small country town well past its prime and not the home of wealthy and educated aristocrats that the more aesthetically minded branch of classical scholarship tends to populate it with. New results on the actual living and economic conditions, such as the predominance of rented housing, throws a new light on the visual culture of the city. We discuss Pompeii’s urban development and social life in relation to evolving trends in what is traditionally called “art.” E. Mayer. Spring.

23411. War in the Hellenistic World. (=CLAS 33411) One might have thought that Alexander’s conquest of the former Persian Empire would have marked the end of the period of wars for the Greek world. The opposite is true: in the post-Alexander era, the Greek world saw again a series of wars, both between major powers and between regional ones. Invasions from barbarian tribes were also a major factor of disruption. This course will explore the phenomenon of war in the Hellenistic period in its many dimensions: political, but also economic, social, religious or artistic ones. Our sources will consist in literary productions (first of all historians like Polybius or Livy), inscriptions (all available in translation), archaeological material, but also in various forms of artistic achievements. A. Bresson. Spring.

24309. Byzantium and Islam (=HIST 22001/32001, CLAS 34309) This is a lecture/discussion course on selected Byzantine-Islamic experiences from the emergence of Islam in the seventh century through the middle of the eleventh century. This is not a narrative survey. There is no single textbook. Topics include diplomatic (political), military, economic, cultural, and religious relations that range from subtle influences and adaptations to open polemics. Readings include modern scholarly interpretations as well as primary source readings in translation. Texts in English. W. Kaegi, Spring.

24311. Byzantine Empire, 1025 to 1453. (=HIST 21703/3170, CLCV 24311, ANCM 36700) This course covers internal and external problems and developments in the Byzantine Empire from 1025 to 1453 (e.g., internal tensions on the eve of the arrival of the Seljuks). Other topics include eleventh-century economic growth, the Crusades, achievements and deficiencies of Komnenian Byzantium, the Fourth Crusade and Byzantine successor states, and the Palaeologan political and cultural revival. We also discuss religious topics such as Bogomilism, Hesychasm, and relations with the Papacy. Readings include M. Angold, The Byzantine Empire, 1025-1204; D. M. Nicol, Last Centuries of Byzantium; and the histories of Michael Psellos and Anna Comnena. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

25611. Aristotle’s Syllogistic. (=PHIL 21712) This course is an introduction to Aristotle’s theory of deductive inference. Readings will be drawn from the Prior Analytics and other works of the Organon. Examples of questions we will discuss are: What is Aristotle’s conception of deduction (syllogismos), and how does it differ from modern conceptions? How can ordinary language arguments be formalized within the Prior Analytics’ syllogistic theory? What role do deductions play in Aristotle’s dialectics (Topics) and theory of science (Posterior Analytics)? We will also look at Aristotle’s justification of perfect syllogisms, proofs by reductio ad impossibile, proofs by ecthesis, the square of opposition, and what is known as the problem of existential import. The course will not presume any prior familiarity with symbolic logic. M. Malink. Spring.

25807. Cicero's De Finibus and Hellenistic Ethics. (=#CLAS 35807, LAWS 52401, PHIL 22215, PHIL 32215, RETH 34200) Cicero's dialogue De Finibus (On Ends) is his attempt to sort out the major arguments for and against the ethical theories characteristic of Epicureanism, Stoicism, and the "New Academy." It thus provides us with some of our best information about the views of these schools, as well as with critical arguments of great interest. We will read extracts from the dialogue in Latin, focusing on Epicureanism (Books I and II) and Stoicism (Books III and IV), and we will study the entire work in translation, along with relevant primary sources for the views of the schools (the surviving letters of Epicurus, central texts of Greek and Roman Stoicism). The course will thus aim to provide a solid introduction to the major ethical theories of the Hellenistic period. M. Nussbaum. Autumn.

The course is open to all who have had five quarters of Latin, or equivalent preparation. Translation will always take place during the first hour, and students without Latin are invited to take the course for an R or audit, arriving after that time and doing all the readings in translation. In some cases Independent Study numbers may be arranged for students who want to do some of the course requirements (paper and exam essays) without Latin. M. Nussbaumn. Winter.

26011. Ancient Views of the Economy. (=CLAS 36011) The ancient economy is a topic that for a long period had fallen into neglect. But for a few years it has experienced an exceptional revival in the field of ancient studies. This is why it is time to revisit classical authors and examine what they can tell us on the economic world they were living in. Starting with Herodotus, moving on with Thucydides, Ps-Iamblichus, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Livy and Cicero, this course will provide a general outlook of what the writers of the Classical and Hellenistic period (for Greece) or Republican period (for Rome) can teach us on the topic. It will show certain continuities between some of them but will also be explicit on the vivid debates that could oppose others. Beyond the economic paradigm, it will also provide a new approach to a series of ancient authors. A. Bresson. Winter.

26206. Roman Visual Culture. (=CLAS 36206, ARTH26805/36805) This general survey of Roman material cultureuses the archaeological evidence complementary to literary sources in order to delineate the development of Roman society from the Early Republic down to the first sacking of Rome in 410 C.E. Urban planning, public monuments, political imagery, and the visual world of Roman cities, houses, and tombs are discussed in relationship to the political and social processes that shaped their formal development. E. Mayer. Winter,

26311. Roman Technologies, Machines and Merchants. (=CLAS 36311). It has always been known that the Greeks and Romans could construct complex machinery. But it is a fairly recent discovery that, in the Roman Imperial Period, machines were used on a large scale to maximize profit in agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This course explores this technological revolution and its economic, social and cultural ramifications. E. Mayer. Winter.

26511. Ancient Economies from Mesopotamia to Rome. (=NELC 20772/30772, CLCV 26511) This team-taught course introduces concepts and methods used in the study of premodern economies and then surveys the economies of the ancient Near East and the Mediterranean from the period of the emergence of literate civilization in the fourth millennium B.C. until the period of the Roman Empire. Separate lectures are devoted to the economic aspects of successive periods in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the eastern Mediterranean, including ancient Greece and Israel. The course concludes with surveys of the economy of the Persian Empire, the Hellenistic empires, and the Roman Empire. D. Schloen. Spring.

27311. Oracles and Divination. We will study the role of prognostication in ancient Greek life and history, in its two major forms: oracles (divine or divinely inspired words usually in the form of hexametrical poetry) and divination (various rituals used to ascertain the will of the gods, for example, the interpretation of the movements of birds or the entrails of sacrificial animals). C. Faraone. Winter.

28000. The Greek City and its Inscriptions. (=CLAS 38000) In the kingdoms of the Near East, the power was in the hands of a single ruler. In the world of the Greek cities of the first millennium BCE, it was in the hands of a group of men, defined as citizens. Among the peculiar achievements of the Greek cities is to be acknowledged an exceptional number of inscriptions, written mostly on stone. This course will explore the link between the inscriptions and the Greek city, both from a conceptual viewpoint and from a practical one. It will concentrate on the public inscriptions of the Greek cities, from the seventh century BCE to the early imperial period. Attending this course supposes mastering ancient Greek, in order to be able to translate the original documents. A. Bresson. Winter.

28300. Ephron Seminar. The goal of this annual seminar of changing context is to promote innovative course design. Examples of past topics are gender, death, violence, and law in the ancient world. Spring.

29100. Ancient Myth. This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29800. B.A. Paper Seminar. PQ: Fourth-year standing. This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their B.A. paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their B.A. papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the B.A. Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the B.A. paper and, therefore, is not reported until the B.A. paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the B.A. paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn Quarter or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters. Autumn, Winter.

Courses: Greek (GREK)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. H. Dik. Autumn.

10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II: Prose. PQ: GREK 10100. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. M. Payne. Winter.

10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. PQ: GREK 10200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 10100-10200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like GREK 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. D. Martinez. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 11100. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. M. Payne. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. PQ: GREK 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Greek I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. We read Plato’s text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax. J. Redfield. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history. H. Dik. Winter.

20300. Intermediate Greek III: Homer. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. This course is a close reading of two books of the Iliad, with an emphasis on the language along with elements of Greek historical linguistics. C. Faraone. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2011–12 will be offered again in 2013–14.

21100/31100. Elegiac Poetry. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. This course is a study of poems composed over a number of centuries in the elegiac meter. Beginning with some of the works of Archilochus and Callinus, we continue through Solon and Simonides to Callimachus and other Hellenistic poets. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

21200/31200. Plato. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. Plato’s styles range from conversational to lyrical to rhetorical, and so on. A master of characterization and parody, he brings a deep appreciation of poetry to his prose. Or so we think. How can we actually identify Plato’s “style” or “styles?” This question has been much debated and, between purple passages, we consider the literature of style and authenticity in the Platonic corpus. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

21300/31300. Tragedy. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama in general, seen through the special problems posed by one play. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

22400/32400. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. PQ: GREK 20600 or equivalent. We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Lysistrata, a play whose timeless popularity often overshadows the fact that it was produced during a particularly menacing period of Athens’ history. Students will prepare translations for class on Mondays and Wednesdays while Fridays will be devoted to discussions, based on secondary readings, that will include staging issues, the function of political comedy, and the potential uses of Aristophanes’ plays as historical evidence. J. Hall. Autumn.

22500/32500.Greek Historians: Herodotus. PQ: GREK 20600 or consent of instructor. Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text. C. Faraone. Winter.

22300/32300. Greek Tragedy I: Euripides. PQ: GREK 20600 or equivalent. We will try to read all of Euripides’ Hippolytus in Greek. Students will be expected to prepare translations for class as well as read secondary material in English. Discussions will focus on the representation of shame aidos and desire, transgression and punishment, and speech and silence in the play. S. Bartsch. Spring.

21700/31700: Lyric and Epinician Poetry. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

21800/31800: Greek Epic. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

21900/31900: Greek Oratory. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

24500. Justin Martyr. (=BIBL 41800, GREK 34500) A careful reading of the Greek text of first apologia of Justin and (as time permits) the Epistle to Diognetus, with attention to his language and literary style. We will also concentrate on Justin as an early defender of and advocate for the Christian faith, the importance of his logos doctrine, his demonology, his sacramental ideas and theology of worship. D. Martinez. Winter.

24611. The Shepherd of Hermas. (=BIBL xxxxxx, GREK 34611) The first eight weeks of the course will focus on a careful reading of the Greek text of the Shepherd with attention to its language, structure, and literary strategies. We will consider the importance of this text as the most frequently read non-biblical Christian book in Egypt and one which itself hovered on the edge of canonicity. The last two weeks of the quarter will be devoted to an examination the papyrus fragments of this important treatise. D. Martinez. Winter.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter.

32800. Survey of Greek Literature II: Prose. A study of the creation of the canonical Greek prose style in the 5th and 4th centuries. Rapid reading and translation exercises. H. Dik. Autumn.

32700. Survey of Greek Literature I: Poetry. Greek poetry, including drama, from Homer to Callimachus. Lectures and discussions will be concerned chiefly with genre, style, meter, and rhetorical structure. There will be some close study of passages chosen to exemplify problems of interpretation or to display the major themes in each poet's work. J. Redfield. Winter.

Modern Greek (MOGK)

11100/30100. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I. (=LGLN 11100) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Autumn.

11200/30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Latin (LATN)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work. Staff. Autumn.

10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 10100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 10100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose. Texts in Latin. Staff. Winter.

10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III: Cicero. PQ: LATN 10200. After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200. Staff. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in fifteen weeks and is appropriate both as an accelerated introduction and also as a systematic grammar review for students who have previously studied Latin. Like LATN 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook (Wheelock). Classes are devoted to the presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises. M. Lowrie. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 11100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin. M. Allen. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: LATN 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in LATN 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text such as a complete speech of Cicero. The aim is familiarity with Latin idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Latin I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Latin I: PQ: LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent. Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catalinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. Some discussion of the history and culture of the period; study of problems of grammar as necessary. C. Ando. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Latin II: Seneca. PQ: LATN 20100 or equivalent. . Readings consist of Seneca’s tragedy Thyestes and selections from his prose letters and essays. Secondary readings on Rome in the Age of Nero, Hellenistic philosophy, and other related topics may also be assigned. S. Bartsch. Winter.

20300. Intermediate Latin III: Vergil, Aeneid. PQ: LATN 20200 or equivalent. This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil’s language, versification, and literary art. Students are also required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation. D. Wray. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2011-12 will be offered again in 2014–15.

21100/31100. Roman Elegy. (=CMLT 21101/31101) This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

21200/31200. Roman Novel. This course is a reading of selected sections of Apuleius’s novel, including the story of Cupid and Psyche and the initiation into the cult of Isis. We study the novel in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention is given to Apuleius’s own contribution as a magician and philosopher. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

21300/31300. Vergil. (=FNDL 25201) Extensive readings in the Aeneid are integrated with extensive selections from the newer secondary literature to provide a thorough survey of recent trends the cult of Isis. We study the novel in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention is given to Apuleius’s own contribution as a magician and philosopher. the cult of Isis. We study the novel in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention is given to Apuleius’s own contribution as a magician and philosopher. Not offered 2011-2012 but will be offered 2013-14.

21600/31600. Roman Oratory. Two of Cicero's speeches for the defense in the criminal courts of Rome receive a close reading in Latin and in English. The speeches are in turn considered in relation to Cicero's rhetorical theory as set out in the De Oratore and in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome. M. Lowrie. Spring.

21700/31700. Epic. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

21800/31800: Roman Historian. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

21900/31900: Comedy. Not offered 2010–11; will be offered 2012–13.

22100/32100. Lucretius. We will read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry will be: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections will include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth. E. Asmis. Autumn.

22200/32200. Roman Satire. The course will focus on Juvenal, and also consider the commentary tradition. M. Allen. Winter.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.