Undergraduate Courses, 2010-2011

Courses: Classical Civilization (CLCV)

Courses designated "Classical Civilization" do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

20200. North Africa: Late Antiquity to Islam. (##Hist 25701, CLAS 30200). Examination of topics in continuity and change from the third through ninth centuries CE, including changes in Roman, Vandalic, Byzantine, and early Islamic Africa. Topics include the waning of paganism and the respective spread and waning of Christianity, the dynamics of the seventh-century Muslim conquest and Byzantine collapse. Transformation of late antique North Africa into a component of Islamic civilization. Topography and issues of the autochthonous populations will receive some analysis. Most of the required reading will be on reserve, for there is no standard textbook. Readings in translated primary sources as well as the latest modern scholarship. Final examination and 10-page course paper. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

20700-20800-20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I, II, III. (=##HIST 16700-16800-16900) Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter, Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter; or Winter, Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), Autumn Quarter; the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), Winter Quarter; and the five centuries between the establishment of imperial autocracy in 27 BC and the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century AD, Spring Quarter.

20700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. (=##HIST 16700) This course surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians. Autumn.

20800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. (=##HIST 16800) This course surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the political crisis following the death of Nero in 68 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community. Winter.

20900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. (=##HIST 16900) This quarter surveys the five centuries between the establishment of imperial autocracy in 27 BC and the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century AD. Spring.

21200. History and Theory of Drama I. (=CLAS 31200, CMLT 20500/30500, ##ENGL 13800/31000, TAPS 28400) May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. This course is a survey of major trends and theatrical accomplishments in Western drama from the ancient Greeks through the Renaissance: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, medieval religious drama, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson, along with some consideration of dramatic theory by Aristotle, Horace, Sir Philip Sidney, and Dryden. The goal is not to develop acting skill but, rather, to discover what is at work in the scene and to write up that process in a somewhat informal report. Students have the option of writing essays or putting on short scenes in cooperation with other members of the class. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended. D. Bevington, H. Coleman. Autumn.

22510. Mimesis. (=CMLT 24902) This course will introduce the concept of mimesis (imitation, representation), tracing it from Plato and Aristotle through some of its reformulations in recent literary, feminist, and critical theory. Topics to be addressed include desire, postcolonialism, and non-western aesthetic traditions. Readings may include Plato, Aristotle, Euripides's Bacchae, Book of Songs, Lu Ji's Rhapsody on Literature, Auerbach, Butler, Derrida, and Spivak. T. Chin. Spring.

24306. Byzantine History 330—610. (##HIST 21701, CLAS 34306). A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the formation of early Byzantine government, society, and culture. Although a survey of event and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. There will be some discussion of relevant archaeology and topography. No prerequisite. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

24307. Byzantine History 610-1025. (##Hist 21702, CLAS 34307). A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principle developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of event and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. No prerequisite. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. W. Kaegi. Spring.

24810. Urban Life and Social Structure in Imperial Rome. (CLAS 34810, ARTH 20910/30910) Ancient literature paints a vivid picture of urban life in Imperial Rome. We know more about Rome's topography, administration and economy than about any other city in the ancient Mediterranean. Still, the social organization and living conditions of ordinary Romans are, in large part, a matter of conjecture. Here, new archaeological and epigraphic studies can help to arrive at a less elite-focused understanding of Rome's urbanism. E. Mayer. Autumn.

24910. All about Varro. (=CLAS 34910) Marcus Terentius Varro was not only a Roman Senator and soldier, but also the most prolific scholar of Latin antiquity, whose writings embraced the study of religion, language, literary history, and other fields. This course offers a survey of his life and work, accompanied by a reading (in English) of as much as possible of what he wrote. P. White. Winter.

25210. Greek and Roman Slavery. (=##Hist, CLAS 35210). While Classical Greece and Rome were among the few civilizations in world history in which slavery permeated all aspects of society, evidence for many aspects of slavery in antiquity is sparse. In this course, we will explore slavery in ancient Greece and Rome in its social, cultural, and economic contexts, with particular emphasis on the methodological challenges that arise from the nature of the evidence. All sources will be read in translation. C. Hawkins. Autumn.

25507. Ancient Greek Mystery Cults. (=CLAS 35507). This course will examine the major mystery cults of the Greek and Roman worlds, beginning with the Eleusinian and Samothracian mysteries and ending with the cults of Isis and Mithras. C. Faraone. Winter.

25510. Homer's Odyssey. (##*FNDL 21901). Required of new Fundamentals majors; open to others with consent of instructor. We read the Odyssey closely in English translation. Discussion topics include identity, maturation, hospitality and friendship, gender, travel and fantasies about other cultures. W. Olmsted. Autumn.

25700-25800-25900. Ancient Empires I, II, III. (=##NEHC 20011-20012-20013) Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Three great empires of the ancient world are introduced in this sequence. Each course focuses on a particular empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires covered in this sequence. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Extensive use is made of visual materials, including artifacts on display in the Oriental Institute Museum. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

25700. Ancient Empires I: The Neo-Assyrian Empire. (=##NEHC 20011). Autumn.

25800. Ancient Empires II: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. (=##NEHC 20012) Winter.

25900. Ancient Empires III: The Roman Empire. (=##NEHC 20013) Spring.

26010. Ancient Caravan Cities. (=CLAS 36010) Many cities of the Roman East were shaped by vibrant inter-regional trade. It has been suggested that they should be understood in analogy to the Caravan Cities of the Islamic Period. This course attempts to test this hypothesis. We will analyze the economy and rich religious and cultural cityscapes of Near Eastern Cities from Apameia on the Orontes to Dura Europos. E. Mayer. Winter.

26200. Visual Culture of Roman and her Empire. (CLAS 36200, ARTH 2/36805) This general survey of Roman material culture will use the archaeological evidence complementary to literary sources in order to delineate the development of Roman society in the first three centuries CE. Urban planning, public monuments, political imagery, and the visual world of Roman cities, houses and tombs will be discussed in relationship to the political and social processes that shaped their formal development. E. Mayer. Autumn.

26310. War and Society in Antiquity. (=##HIST, CLAS 36310) In this course we will study the interplay between warfare and the political, social, and economic structures of the ancient Mediterranean world. We will explore topics such as the motivations for and ideology of armed conflict, the relationship between military organization and civic structure, and the impact of hegemonic and imperial expansion on both the conquerors and the conquered. The course readings will incorporate foundational modern perspectives, but will emphasize ancient sources in translation. C. Hawkins. Winter.

26710. Where Anatolia Meets Greece: The Archaeology of the Western Coast of Turkey. (=NEAA) Western Anatolia is a diverse and often understudied region. Its complexity is largely due to its unsure place in the world of archaeology: is the region part of Anatolia or Greece? Should Near Eastern or Classical archaeologists study the region? There are no clear-cut answers to these questions, for the western coast of modern Turkey has connections to many different cultural spheres, as well as its own vibrant history and cultures.
    This class is designed to provide students with a general survey of the archaeology of civilizations present along the western coast of Anatolia and their often-neglected place in the identities and histories of the ancient Near Eastern and Classical world. The time range covered will span from the Early Bronze Age until the conquest of Alexander, in 333 BCE, with a main emphasis on the Achaemenid period. The class will cover both historical and archaeological aspects of the cities of Troy and Ephesus, as well as the civilizations of the Phrygians, Lydians, Carians and Lycians. Additionally, the class will have four classes devoted to uncovering the complex and easily misunderstood relationship of Western Anatolia and its Anatolian, Aegean, Persian and Greek identities and connections.
    Furthermore, the class will provide students with an understanding of archaeological practice and literature and how archaeological sites are published. To this end, students will read selections of excavation reports each week, in addition to overviews of the civilizations studied. We will have weekly discussions of these publications regarding the style, content, strengths and weaknesses.
    This class is meant for undergraduates with an interest in the region, but not necessarily any prior knowledge of either Anatolia or archaeology. S. Selover. Autumn.

27110. The Philosophical Adviser to Rulers in Classical Antiquity. In this course we shall consider one of the most persistent thought-paradigms in classical antiquity: the philosopher-counselor who, by imparting his wisdom to a receptive statesman or monarch, creates enlightened government for all. Copious literature was produced, in both Greek and Latin, on fundamental theoretical questions surrounding this notion: why was the philosophical advisor necessary at all? What lessons should he impart, and to which philosophical sect (if any) should he adhere? How ought he to walk the tightrope between debasing flattery and brash moralizing that might alienate his audience? We shall read and discuss some of the most important writings on the topic, from authors such as Plato, Cicero, Seneca, Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, Plutarch, and Dio Chrysostom, and consider whether we can speak of a coherent genre of "advice literature", with its own preoccupations, conventions, and points of contestation. We shall also contextualize our readings within the many unhappy historical episodes that resulted from trying to make this dream a reality -- Plato's own failure at Syracuse, Sphairos the Stoic's role in the rise and fall of the Spartan king Kleomenes III, Cicero's inability to shore up the collapsing Republic, and Seneca's tragic career -- which ultimately created an entirely new intellectual paradigm, that of the "philosophical opposition" to the unjust ruler. Finally, we shall examine the would-be "philosophical emperors", Marcus Aurelius and Julian, and consider how successfully they resolved the tension between philosophical idealism and the realities of power. All sources will be read in translation; some knowledge of Greek or Latin is helpful, but not required. T. Keith. Spring.

28300. Ephron Seminar. The goal of this annual seminar of changing content is to promote innovative course design. Examples of past topics are gender, death, violence, and law in the ancient world. Spring.

28401. Comparative Metrics. (=CMLT 28401/38401, CLAS 38401). This class offers an overview of major European systems of versification, with particular attention to their historical development. We will be particularly concerned with Graeco-Roman quantitative metrics, its afterlife, and the evolution of Germanic and Slavic verse. In addition to analyzing the formal properties of verse, we will inquire into their relevance for the articulation of poetic genres and, more broadly, the history of literary (and sub-literary) systems. No prerequisites, but a working knowledge of one European language besides English is strongly recommended. B. Rodin. Spring.

29100. Ancient Myth. This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29800. BA Paper Seminar. PQ: Fourth-year standing. This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their BA paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their BA papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the BA Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the BA paper and, therefore, is not reported until the BA paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the BA paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn Quarter or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters. Autumn, Winter.

Courses: Greek (GREK)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. H. Dik. Autumn.

10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 10100. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. M. Payne. Winter.

10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. PQ: GREK 10200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 10100-10200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like GREK 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. M. Payne. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 11100. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. H. Dik. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. PQ: GREK 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Greek I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. PQ: GREK 10300, 11300 or equivalent. We read Plato's text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax. J. Redfield. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. PQ: GREK 20100 or equivalent. This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history. S. Nooter. Winter.

20300. Intermediate Greek III: Homer. PQ: GREK 20200 or equivalent. Close reading of two books of the Iliad, with an emphasis on the language along with elements of Greek historical linguistics. D. Martinez. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2009-10 will be offered again in 2012-13.

21100/31100. Elegiac Poetry. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. This course is a study of poems composed over a number of centuries in the elegiac meter. Beginning with some of the works of Archilochus and Callinus, we continue through Solon and Simonides to Callimachus and other Hellenistic poets. S. Nooter. Autumn.

21200/31200. Plato. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. Plato's styles range from conversational to lyrical to rhetorical and so on. A master of characterization and parody, he brings a deep appreciation of poetry to his prose. Or so we think. How can we actually identify Plato's "style" or "styles?" This question has been much debated and, between purple passages, we consider the literature of style and authenticity in the Platonic corpus. J. Redfield. Winter.

21300/31300. Tragedy. PQ: GREK 203000 or equivalent. This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama in general, seen through the special problems posed by one play. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed. C. Faraone. Spring.

21700/31700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/13.

21800/31800. Greek Epic. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/13.

21900/31900. Greek Oratory. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/13.

22300/32300. Greek Tragedy I. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

22400/32400. Greek Comedy. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

22500/32500. Greek Historians. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

##25110/35110. Greek Scribes and Scholars. This course will examine how we come by our classical Greek texts. We will read the first textual scholars and grammarians and discuss the fundamentals of textual criticism. Students will get an introduction to Greek palaeography, read text and scholia in the Venetus A Iliad, and learn about Alexandrian scholarship on the texts and on the Greek language. Texts: Reynolds & Wilson, Scribes and Scholars; Dickey, Ancient Greek Scholarship. PQ: At least two years of Greek. H. Dik. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter.

34400. Greek Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course focuses on intensive study of the structures of the Greek language and the usage of the canonical Greek prose, including compositional exercises. Autumn. Not offered 2010-11 will be offered 2011-12.

Courses: Modern Greek (MOGK)

##11100/30100. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I. (=LGLN 11100) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Autumn.

##11200/30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Courses: Latin (LATN)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

##10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work. Autumn.

##10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 10100. This course continues through the basic text begun in LATN 10100. Winter.

##10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: LATN 10200. After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in fifteen weeks and is appropriate both as an accelerated introduction and also as a systematic grammar review for students who have previously studied Latin. Like LATN 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook. Classes are devoted to the presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises. M. Allen. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 11100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin. P. White. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: LATN 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in LATN 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text such as a complete speech of Cicero. Our aim is familiarity with Latin idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Latin I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Latin I: Cicero. PQ: LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent. Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catilinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. The course includes some discussion of the history and culture of the period, as well as study of problems of grammar as necessary. M. Allen. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Latin II: Seneca. PQ: LATN 20100 or equivalent. Readings consist of a Senecan tragedy and selections from his prose letters and essays. Secondary readings on Rome in the Age of Nero and related topics are also assigned. D. Wray. Winter.

20300. Intermediate Latin III: Vergil, Aeneid. PQ: LATN 20200 or equivalent. This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil's language, versification, and literary art. Students also are required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation. S. Bartsch. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2009-10 will be offered again in 2012-13.

21100/31100. Roman Elegy. This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona. M. Payne. Autumn.

21200/31200. Roman Novel. This course is a reading of selected sections of Apuleius' novel, including the story of Cupid and Psyche and the initiation into the cult of Isis. We study the novel in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention is given to Apuleius' own contribution as a magician and philosopher. M. Payne. Winter.

21300/31300. Virgil. (FNDL 25201) Extensive readings in the Aeneid are integrated with extensive selections from the newer secondary literature to provide a thorough survey of recent trends in Vergilian criticism, and of Latin poetry more generally. E. Asmis. Spring.

22200/32200. Roman Satire. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

22100/32100. Lucretius. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

22300/32300. Roman Oratory. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2011/12.

21700/31700. Epic. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/13.

21800/31800. Roman Historian. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/13.

21900/31900. Comedy. Not offered in 2010/11, will be offered in 2012/3.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

34400. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students' awareness of the classical artists' skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. S. Bartsch. Autumn.