Undergraduate Courses, 2009-2010

Faculty

M. Allen, C. Ando, E. Asmis, S. Bartsch, A. Bresson, H. Dik, C. A. Faraone, J. Hall, W. R. Johnson, D. Martinez, E. Mayer, S. Nooter, M. Payne, J. M. Redfield, D. N. Rudall, P. White, D. Wray

Classical Civilization (CLCV)

Courses designated "Classical Civilization" do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

20700-20800-20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I, II, III. (=HIST 16700-16800-16900) Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter, Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter; or Winter, Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. For course description, see History. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

21200. History and Theory of Drama I. (=CLAS 31200, CMLT 20500/30500, ENGL 13800/31000, TAPS 28400) May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. For course description, see English Language and Literature. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended. D. Bevington / H. Coleman. Autumn.

21700. Archaeology for Ancient Historians. (=CLAS 31700, ##HIST 20901. 39800, ANCM 31700) This course is intended to act not as an introduction to Classical Archaeology but as a methods course illuminating the potential contribution of material cultural evidence to ancient historians while at the same time alerting them to the possible misapplications. Theoretical reflections on the relationship between history and archaeology will be interspersed with specific case-studies from the Graeco-Roman world. J. Hall. Winter.

23909. Stoics and Epicureans. (=CLAS 43909/33909) This course will focus on the issue of personal freedom. The Stoics and Epicureans both offered their own answer to the question: what makes a person free? Neither group identified freedom with the absence of political constraints or with political activity. Both were concerned to preserve freedom despite external constraints. The Epicureans looked for it in the ability to achieve freedom from pain and anxiety, and in the companionship of friends. The Stoics identified it with moral integrity and raised questions of how to deal with political pressures. We will explore their answers by reading Epicurus' writings and Lucretius, Cicero's On Duties, and Epictetus' Discourses. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required. The course may be taken either as a graduate seminar or as an advanced undergraduate course. E. Asmis, Spring.
Consent of instructor is required. Please email: e-asmis@uchicago.edu.

23910. Liberty and Equality in Ancient Political Thought. (=CLAS 43910/33910, FNDL 25532) Please note that this course has been replaced with CLAS 43909/33909, CLCV 23909: Stoics and Epicureans.

24309. Byzantium and Islam. (=##Hist, CLAS 34309) W. Kaegi. Spring.

##25409. Feeding Greece: Grain production and trade from the archaic to the Hellenistic period. (=CLAS 35409). Grain was the major item of the ancient Greek diet. Besides, the ancient population of Greece reached a comparatively high level. But given the techniques of agriculture and the qualities of the Greek soils, the imbalance between production and consumption was permanent. This made imports of grain vital. Within the cities, policies of control of the grain market also had to be implemented. It is all the aspects connected to the issue of grain, from production to consumption in passing by the organisation of the market or the food crisis and their devastating consequences that this course would like to address. From Aristotle and Demosthenes to Diodorus and Cicero, this course will draw heavily on literary sources. But epigraphic and papyrological texts will offer also a large body of evidence. Beyond the case of grain, this course will allow the students to get an insight on a whole set of economic as well as political, social and religious behaviors in the ancient Greek world. A. Bresson, Autumn.

##25509. The Greek colonial world in the Archaic and Classical period (=CLAS 35509). The Aegean cities, and first of all Athens, are linked the great achievements of ancient Greece. But in the Archaic and Classical periods, a new Greece came into being, scattered all over the shores of the ancient Mediterranean. This course will show how starting from very modest beginnings the societies of the new colonial world soon produced a constellation of brilliant cities that had an existence of their own. The investigation will be based on textual as well as archaeological material and the course will examine the social, political, religious and economic aspects of this dynamic. It will cover a broad geographical field, from Spain to southern Asia Minor or Egypt, and from Cyrene to the Pontos. When necessary, it will also draw on anthropology or economics, which provide powerful tools to explain such an exceptional phenomenon as the Greek colonial expansion. A. Bresson. Winter.

25700-25800-25900. Ancient Empires I, II, III. (=NEHC 20011-20012-20013) Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Near Eastern History and Civilization). Autumn, Winter, Spring.

  • 25700. Ancient Empires I: The Neo-Assyrian Empire. (=NEHC 20011) G. Emberling. Autumn.
  • 25800. Ancient Empires II: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. (=NEHC 20012) Winter.
  • 25900. Ancient Empires III: The Roman Empire. (=NEHC 20013) Spring.

##26209. Roman Visual Culture in the NW Provinces. (=CLAS 36209) The focus of classical archaeology is on the visual culture of Rome's wealthy Mediterranean provinces. But the work of archaeologists in Britain, Gaul, and Central Europe has yielded a rich and interesting sample of Roman art in a variety of social settings. These materials reflect the interaction between local and Mediterranean culture and thereby allow for a better contextualization of Roman visual culture. This, in turn, helps to improve our understanding of ancient art in general. E. Mayer, Spring.

##26409. Romans Outside Rome. (=CLAS 36409) This course will study the complex history of Roman settlements and emigration outside Italy over the course of the empire. We will consider the various problems of demography, urban design, cross-cultural exchange attendant upon this history, the friction that often arose in the period of conquest between Roman settlers and recently conquered peoples, as well as the contribution that communities of mixed background ultimately made to the creation of a cosmopolitan, imperial culture. C. Ando, Spring.

##27706. Historicizing Desire. (=EALC 27410, GNDR 28001, CMLT 270000) Course meets the critical/intellectual methods course requirement for students majoring in Comparative Literature. This course will examine conceptions of desire in ancient China and ancient Greece through an array of early philosophical, literary, historical, legal and medical texts (e.g. Mencius, Sima Qian, Book of Songs, Plato, Sappho). We will attempt not only to bring out the cultural specificities of ancient erotic experience, but also to make visible the historical and geopolitical contingencies of our own methods of reading. To do so, we will explore the broader cultural background of the two ancient periods, and engage with theoretical debates on the history of sexuality, feminist and queer studies, and inter-cultural comparative studies. T. Chin. Winter.

27709. Caesar and his Reception. (=CLAS 37709) Julius Caesar is a captivating figure in the Western political and literary imaginary. Consummate general, admired stylist, lover of Cleopatra, winner of the civil war against Pompey, and dictator for life, Caesar seems to have it all until his assassination by some of his closest friends. Did he have the ambition to control the state from the beginning or did he react in response to provocation? Did he have a just cause for waging civil war? Was he a figure of consummate cruelty or did he do atrocious things to forward a progressive political agenda? How are we to interpret his vaunted clemency? To address these questions, we will read Julius Caesar’s extant works and examine the rich variety of representations of this charismatic figure in imperial Greek and Roman literature (Appian, Plutarch, Suetonius, Lucan) and beyond (Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, Handel’s Giulio Cesare, Richard Nelson’s 2008 play, Conversations in Tusculum). M. Lowrie. Winter.

##27909. Visual Culture of Rome and its Empire. (CLCV 26206, CLAS 37909, ARTH 26805/36805) This general survey of Roman material culture will use the archaeological evidence complementary to literary sources in order to delineate the development of Roman society from the Early Republic down to the first sacking of Rome in 410 CE. Urban planning, public monuments, political imagery, and the visual world of Roman cities, houses and tombs will be discussed in relationship to the political and social processes that shaped their formal development. E. Mayer, Winter.

28300. Ephron Seminar: The evolution of the Classical text: textual transmission and scholarly practices from antiquity to the digital age. The goal of this course is to examine how Classical texts, along with the scholarly practices that have shaped them, have developed over time. More specifically, we will focus on the materials involved in textual transmission (papyrus, codex, print, and digital media) and consider how these materials have influenced scholarly practices and produced different ways of thinking about texts. Attention will primarily be given to the textual traditions of Homer and Archimedes, but in the context of the broader trends in the history of Classical scholarship. We will also devote time to assessing the present-day state of the field and consider the developments opened up by the increasing use of digital texts and media. Familiarity with Greek or Latin is not required, nor is prior technical knowledge assumed. Students should come out of this course with an understanding of the major trends in textual criticism and a useful foundation for further work in digital humanities. A. Lee. Spring.
(The goal of this annual seminar of changing context is to promote innovative course design. Examples of past topics are gender, death, violence, and law in the ancient world.)

28609. Greek and Roman Historiography. (=##HIST, CLAS 38609, ANCM 38609). C. Hawkins, Spring.

##29100. Ancient Myth. This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29800. B.A. Paper Seminar. PQ: Fourth-year standing. This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their B.A. paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their B.A. papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the B.A. Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the B.A. paper and, therefore, is not reported until the B.A. paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the B.A. paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn Quarter or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters. Autumn, Winter.

Greek (GREK)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

  • 10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. H. Dik. Autumn.
  • 10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 10100. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. S. Nooter. Winter.
  • 10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. PQ: GREK 10200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 10100-10200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. D. Wray. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like GREK 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

  • 11100. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. J. Redfield. Autumn.
  • 11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 11100. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. H. Dik. Winter.
  • 11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. PQ: GREK 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Greek I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

  • 20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. We read Plato's text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax. J. Redfield. Autumn.
  • 20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history. C. Faraone. Winter.
  • 20300. Intermediate Greek III: Homer. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. Close reading of two books of the Iliad, with an emphasis on the language along with elements of Greek historical linguistics. D. Wray. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2008-09 will be offered again in 2011-12.

21700/31700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. PQ: GREK 20300 or equivalent. The first half of this class traces the development of Greek lyric poetry from the fragments of the archaic poets Alcman, Sappho, Anacreon, and Alcaeus, to the sophisticated reuse of archaic themes in the Hellenistic lyrics of Theocritus. In the second half we follow the course of epinician poetry from Simonides through Pindar and Bacchylides to Callimachus. S. Nooter. Autumn.

21800/31800. Greek Epic: Apollonius. This course is a reading of Book 3 of the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. We consider character, story world, and the presence of the poet as we endeavor to understand what has become of epic poetry in the hands of its Hellenistic inheritors. M. Payne. Winter, 2010.

21900/31900. Greek Orators: Demosthenes, De Corona. PQ: Two years or more of Greek. Demosthenes' On the Crown, more than any other speech that has come to us from antiquity, has been held up as the "gold standard" of classical rhetorical prose. We read the entire Greek text with attention to the language, style, and rhetorical energy that have merited such unrestrained praise. We focus on how Demosthenes uses history, exploits Greek notions of patriotism, and develops character assassination to a high art. We also consider the extent to which the finished product may be considered one of the supreme documents of Athenian power and liberty. E. Asmis. Spring, 2010.

22300. Greek Tragedy I. (=GREK 32300). PQ: GREK 20300 or equivalent. Reading in Greek of a tragic drama by Aeschylus, Sophocles or Euripides. Discussion focuses on the social, intellectual and cultural contexts of Athenian tragedy. Staff. Autumn 2009.

22400. Greek Comedy. (=GREK 32400). We will read Aristophanes' Acharnians, his first extant play, and do forays into Aristophanes' relationship to Euripides in other plays. The course will examine the close relationship between Tragedy and Comedy in the last years of the Athenian Empire. Staff. Winter, 2010.

22500. Greek Historical Writing Herodotus (=GREK 32500). Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text. Staff. Spring, 2010.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter.

34400. Greek Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course focuses on intensive study of the structures of the Greek language and the usage of the canonical Greek prose, including compositional exercises. H. Dik. Autumn.

Modern Greek (MOGK)

11100/30100. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I. (=LGLN 11100) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Autumn.

11200/30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Latin (LATN)

10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

  • 10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work. Autumn.
  • 10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 10100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 10100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose. Texts in Latin. Winter.
  • 10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III: Cicero. PQ: LATN 10200. After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200. Spring.

11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in fifteen weeks and is appropriate both as an accelerated introduction and also as a systematic grammar review for students who have previously studied Latin. Like LATN 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

  • 11100. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook. Classes are devoted to the presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises. M. Allen. Autumn.
  • 11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 11100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin. Winter.
  • 11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: LATN 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in LATN 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text such as a complete speech of Cicero. Our aim is familiarity with Latin idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Latin I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

  • 20100. Intermediate Latin I: PQ: LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent. Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catilinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. The course includes some discussion of the history and culture of the period, as well as study of problems of grammar as necessary. Autumn.
  • 20200. Intermediate Latin II: Seneca. PQ: LATN 20100 or equivalent. Readings consist of a Senecan tragedy and selections from his prose letters and essays. Secondary readings on Rome in the Age of Nero and related topics are also assigned. P. White. Winter.
  • 20300. Intermediate Latin III: Vergil, Aeneid. PQ: LATN 20200 or equivalent. This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil's language, versification, and literary art. Students also are required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation. M. Payne. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2008-09 will be offered again in 2011-12.

21100/31100. Roman Elegy. This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. The major themes of the course are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona. Staff. Autumn, 2009.

21200/31200. Roman Novel. A reading of selected sections of Apuleius' novel, including the story of Cupid and Psyche, and the initiation into the cult of Isis. The novel will be studied in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention will be given to Apuleius' own contribution as a magician and philosopher. Staff. Winter, 2010.

21300/31300. Virgil. Extensive readings in the Aeneid are integrated with extensive selections from the newer secondary literature to provide a thorough survey of recent trends in Vergilian criticism of Latin poetry more generally. Staff. Spring, 2010.

21400/31400. Lucretius. We read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry is: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on Earth. D. Wray. Autumn.

21500/31500. Roman Satire. The object of this course is to study the emergence of satire as a Roman literary genre with a recognized subject matter and style. Readings include Horace Satires 1.1, 4, 6, and 10 and 2.1, 5 and 7; Persius2; and Juvenal 1 and 3. M. Allen. Spring.

21600/31600. Roman Oratory. Two of Cicero's speeches for the defense in the criminal courts of Rome receive a close reading in Latin and in English.The speeches are in turn considered in relation to Cicero's rhetorical theory as set out in the De Oratore and in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome. P. White. Spring.

21700/31700. Post-Vergilian Epic. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. We will read two books of Ovid's Metamorphoses in Latin and the entire poem in translation. Discussion topics will include prosody, diction, narrative technique, epic tradition, and comparative mythology.D. Wray Autumn, 2009.

21800/31800. Roman Historiography. Primary readings are drawn from the Tiberian books, in which Tacitus describes the consolidation of the imperial regime after the death of Augustus. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative. Winter, 2010.

21900/31900. Roman Comedy. (=TAPS 28425) This course is a reading of a comic play by Plautus or Terence with discussion of original performance context and issues of genre, Roman comedy's relation to Hellenistic New Comedy, and related questions. Spring, 2010.

25000/35000. Augustine's Confession. PQ: Latin 206 or equivalent. (FNDL 24310, RLST 25101) Substantial selections from books 1 through 9 of the Confessions are read in Latin (and all thirteen books in English), with particular attention to Augustine's style and thought. Further readings in English provide background about the historical and religious situation of the late fourth century A.D. P. White. Spring.

25200/35200. Medieval Latin. M. Allen. Autumn.

27209/37209. Cicero's De Officiis (On Duties). (=PHIL, ##LAW, PolSC) This class will study one of the most influential works in the whole history of Western political thought, a primary foundation for modern ideas of global justice and the just war. We will understand it in the context of Cicero's thought and its background in Hellenistic philosophy, and we will also do readings in translation that show its subsequent influence. Prerequisite. To enroll for credit, you must have had five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others may audit. The translating will always be done in the first hour of the class, so those who do not want to participate can arrive an hour late. Requirements: a midterm and a final exam, and a final paper. M. Nussbaum, Winter.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

34400. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students' awareness of the classical artists' skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. Not offered 2009-10; will be offered 2010-2011.