Graduate Courses 2015-16

Graduate Courses, 2015-16

Classics:

31515. Colloquium: Late Antique Mediterranean 1. (=ANCM 31515; HIST 41005). Research problems in eastern, central, and western Mediterranean from the fourth to seventh century CE. Detailed investigation of relevant primary sources in Greek, Latin, and Arabic. Will continue in winter quarter. PQ: Upper-level undergraduates with consent of instructor; meets with HIST 71005. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

31516.  Colloquium: Late Antique Mediterranean 2 (= HIST 41006; ANCM 31516) Research problems in eastern, central, and western Mediterranean from the fourth to seventh century CE. Detailed investigation of relevant primary sources in Greek, Latin, and Arabic. In the winter quarter, we focus on research topics for the colloquium paper.PQ: Upper-level undergraduates with consent of instructor; meets with HIST 71006.  W. Kaegi. Winter.

31915.  Present Past in Greece.  (CLCV 21915,  =HIST 2/31006) This discussion-based course will explore how conceptions of the ancient past have been mobilized and imagined in the political, social, and cultural discourses of modern Greece from the lead up to the War of Independence through to the present day. Among the themes that will be addressed are ethnicity and nationalism; theories of history; the production of archaeological knowledge; and the politics of display. J. Hall.  Winter.

32115. Carolingian Renaissance. (=CLCV 22115; HIST 2/32115, HCHR 34304) The Carolingian Renaissance flowered thanks to the leadership of a new royal (AD 751) and then (from Christmas 800) imperial dynasty.  Expansive political and cultural initiatives reshaped Europe into a distinct space, not least, though paradoxically, through its fragmentation after AD 843.  We shall study the actors and trends at play, the important role of Classical models and Latin book culture, and consider the relevant sources in all their physical, textual, and imaginative variety.  M. Allen. Winter.

32515. Athenian Democracy and its Critics, (=PLSC 42501). This course explores the ancient Athenian experience of democracy through the writings of some of its staunchest partisans and fiercest critics. The course introduces students to the ideology and institutions of Athenian democracy. We investigate topics such as the role of popular institutions in politics, including the Assembly and the Popular Courts; Athens’ extensive system of political accountability; and the democratic values that the Athenians took as justification for their politics and way of life. The course also analyzes some of the critical responses Athenian democracy provoked. Topics covered include the relationship between democracy and tyranny; Athenian democracy and imperialism; and the role of rhetoric in democratic decision-making. Readings include works by ancient historians, philosophers, dramatists, and rhetoricians, as well as modern scholars. M. Landauer. Spring.

32615. Knowledge and Politics.   M. Landauer. Spring.

33315. History of Skepticism, Pre-socratic Greece to Enlightenment. (CLCV 23315; HIST 29314/39314 ). Doubt has been a fundamental tool from the foundations of Western philosophy, used by radicals and orthodox thinkers, skeptics and system-builders, theologians and scientists. Philosophical skepticism and its evolving palette of intellectual tools shaped the ancient philosophical schools of Greece and Rome, the solidification of early Christian doctrine, the scholastic debates of the later Middle Ages, the neoclassical explosions of the renaissance, the "new philosophy" of the seventeenth century, the radical projects of the Enlightenment, and the advent of the modern scientific method. This course reviews the history of systematic philosophical doubt, focusing on primary source readings, from Sextus Empiricus and Cicero to William of Ockham and the Averroist controvercies, to Montaigne, Descartes, Bacon, and Diderot. Undergraduate writing assignments focus on polishing advanced writing ability through short assignments targeting concision, critical thinking, and journalistic writing skills with creative elements. Enrolled graduate students will be invited to additional graduate-only discussions and have supplementary assignments, including secondary source and historiographical readings and self-designed customized research papers. Both undergraduates and graduate students from outside the Department of History are welcome. A. Palmer. Autumn.

33815. Plato's Legacies. (=PLSC 43801).  Some of the most significant efforts to question political theory's core concepts, unsettle its approaches, and expose its dangerous ideals have depended on major re-interpretations of Plato's thought. This course investigates the broad critical impulse to treat Plato as the originator of political positions and interpretive assumptions that late modernity frequently seeks to critique and less often to celebrate. We consider the charges of essentialism, authoritarianism, and foundationalism, among others, and ask to what (if any) extent considerations of the texts' historical contexts and dramaturgical conditions have factored into these assessments. Readings will include works by Popper, Strauss, Arendt, Derrida, Castoriadis, Wolin, Irigaray, Cavarero, Butler, and Rancière alongside Plato's dialogues. Students are expected to be familiar with Plato's thought upon enrolling.  D. Kasimis. Winter.

33915. Plato's Republic. This course is devoted to reading and discussion of Plato’s Republic and some secondary work with attention to justice in the city and the soul, war and warriors, psychology, education, theology, poetry, gender, eros, and cities in speech and actually existing cities.  N. Tarcov. Winter.

34216.  Conquerors of the ancient world, from Cyrus to Islam.  (=CLCV 24216).  From the Achaemenids (sixth century BCE) to Islam (seventh century CE), this class will examine the cases of the great conquerors of the ancient world: Cyrus, Alexander, Caesar, Justinian, Muawiyah I. What motivated them? Were they only creatures of circumstances or creators or circumstances? Were they great civilizers or brutal destroyers of civilizations? How can we assess the long term impact of the creation of empires? The class will invite to a broader discussion on the role of individuals as history-makers and on the role of war to shape history. It will also examine the still present consequences of the great deeds of these conquerors. All ancient texts will be analyzed in translation. A. Bresson. Winter.

34515.   Money and the Ancient Greek World. (=CLCV 24515) The ancient Greek world saw an innovation the consequences of which are still familiar to everyone: coinage. This was first a currency of precious metal. But the ancient Greek world also saw the invention of fiduciary money. This class will examine the special forms taken by money in the ancient Greek world. It will give an introduction to Greek numismatics. Above all, it will analyze the policies of the states towards coinage, as well as the philosophical debates to which the specific forms of money gave rise in the ancient Greek world. Ancient texts will be analyzed both in original language and in translation. A. Bresson. Spring.

35315. Jews in Graeco Roman Egypt (=CLCV 25315, NEHC 20486, JWSC 20485). This course will revise the sources, literary and documentary, for the history of the Jews in Egypt from the 5th cent. BCE (the Elephantine papyri) to the 4th cent CE (Jews and Christians in Egypt). We will revise both the papyrological evidence and the literary evidence that we have for each period, and will focus on historical and social questions. The sources will be read in translation. S. Torallas. Autumn.

35415.  Text into Data:  Digitial Philology. (=CLCV 25415)  Corpus research used to mean collecting data by hand by copying examples from texts onto index cards, or consulting indices to particular authors and works to collect examples. Digital textcorpora allow us to query large corpora, and to develop our own corpora to suit our particular research questions. This course introduces students to Digital Philology in the Classics, arguably the most flourishing sector of the Digital Humanities. Students will do a combination of readings from secondary literature, ‘lab work’ to suit their own research interests, and present a final project. This course is open to undergraduates and graduates. H. Dik.  Spring.

35606.  Lucretius and Marx.  (=CLCV 25606).  ) Lucretius was a follower of Epicurus, whom Marx called "the greatest representative of Greek enlightenment". In his poem On the Nature of Things, Lucretius seeks to convert his fellow Romans to an Epicurean way of life. He explains in detail what the world is made of (atoms) and that there is no reason to fear the gods or death. Marx wrote his doctoral dissertation on Epicurus and Lucretius. He was especially enthusiastic about the idea, which was developed by Lucretius, that humans are free to shape their own lives. E. Asmis.  Autumn.

35808.  Roman Law.  (=CLCV 25808, HIST 2/31004, LLSO 21212). The course will treat several problems arising in the historical development of Roman law: the history of procedure; the rise and accommodation of multiple sources of law, including the emperor; the dispersal of the Roman community from the environs of Rome to the wider Mediterranean world; and developments in the law of persons. We will discuss problems like the relationship between religion and law from the archaic city to the Christian empire, and between the law of Rome and the legal systems of its subject communities. C. Ando. Spring.

36302 Iconoclasm and Animation (ARTH 41305) This course will serve as a historically situated, philosophically inflected, introduction to the methods developed in the twentieth century for the study of images.  It will address the discipline of Art History in Germany and Austria in the years up to 1933, the conflict of Protestant and Catholic models for the historiography of images before the first World War, the effects of the Nazi regime on the writing of the history of art, and the impact of the Second World War on scholarship in both Germany and among refugees, many of them Jews.  It is intended to serve both as an introduction to the critical historiography of art and to some of the prime methods developed in the last century for the study of images.The course will begin on Monday, March 28 and end Thursday, April 28. Jas’ Elsner. Spring

PQ:  This course will be taught in an intensive twice a week format over 5 weeks. 
 

37506.  Archaic Greece.  (=CLCV 27506, HIST 2/30303, ANCM 37506) . In order to understand the institutions, ideals and practices that characterized Greek city-states in the Classical period, it is necessary to look to their genesis and evolution during the preceding Archaic period (ca. 700-480 BC). This course will examine the emergence and early development of the Greek city-states through a consideration of ancient written sources, inscriptions, material artifacts and artistic representations as well as more recent secondary treatments of the period. General topics to be covered will include periodization, the rise of the polis, religion, warfare, the advent and uses of literacy, tyranny and the emergence of civic ideology.   J. Hall.  Autumn.

38315. Theories of Narrative.  (=CMLT 38315, REES 33158) This class serves as an introduction to critical approaches to narrative, story-telling, and discourse analysis. While the emphasis will be on the Formalist-Structuralist tradition (Shklovsky, Propp, Tomashevsky, Jakobson, Benveniste, Barthes, Genette), we will also discuss works by Plato, Aristotle, Bakhtin, Benjamin, Auerbach, Pavel, Banfield, Silverstein, and others. Part of our task will be to test these approaches against narratives produced in different genres and historical periods (authors will include Pindar, Apuleius, Pushkin, Leskov, and Nabokov). Students will have the option of either writing a research paper or doing a final exam. Required books for this class are:  V. Propp, The Morphology of the Folktale (Austin: U. of Texas Press); G. Genette, Narrative Discourse: An Essay in Method (Ithaca: Cornell UP); R. Barthes, S/Z (New York: Hill and Wang).  B. Maslov. Spring.

41316.  Iconoclasm and Animation. (= RLIT 36302, ARTH 41305) This course will serve as a historically situated, philosophically inflected, introduction to the methods developed in the twentieth century for the study of images.  It will address the discipline of Art History in Germany and Austria in the years up to 1933, the conflict of Protestant and Catholic models for the historiography of images before the first World War, the effects of the Nazi regime on the writing of the history of art, and the impact of the Second World War on scholarship in both Germany and among refugees, many of them Jews.  It is intended to serve both as an introduction to the critical historiography of art and to some of the prime methods developed in the last century for the study of images. J. Elsner. Spring.

PQ:  This course will be taught in an intensive twice a week format over 5 weeks.  The course will begin on Monday, March 28 and end Thursday, April 28.

41415. Seminar: Late Antique Mediterranean 1 (=HIST 71005; ANCM 41415).  PQ: Meets with HIST 41005. Research problems in eastern, central, and western Mediterranean from the fourth to seventh century CE. Detailed investigation of relevant primary sources in Greek, Latin, and Arabic. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

41416. Seminar: Late Antique Mediterranean 2  (=HIST 71005. ANCM 41416). In the winter quarter we focus on research topics for the seminar paper. PQ: HIST 71005 (Autumn); meets with HIST 41006.  W. Kaegi. Winter.

41616. Seminar:  Approaches to Knowledge (=KNOW 40200-01)  The goal of this module is to identify central issues or debates in the theory of knowledge over the past century.  Students will be introduced to basic issues in the sociology of knowledge, to the arguments for and against constructivist perspectives on knowledge, and to 21st century scientific standards for knowledge production.  The course should provide students with a vocabulary and conceptual tools with which they argue about these issues and reflect upon the very conceptual tools they are using. S. Bartsch; J. Gilbert.  Winter.

41617.  Seminar: Democratic Knowledge (=KNOW 40200-02)  This module offers a variation on studies of the epistemic powers of democracy.  Instead of asking questions such as how effective democracies are at gathering the knowledge they need to function, the module looks at what forms of knowledge democracies need to assume—for example, the validity of decisions taken by the many—in order to justify their own existence as a (“superior”) form of government.  S. Bartsch; W. Howell.  Winter.

42815. Seminar: Aeschylus and the Birth of Drama (=CMLT 42804) In this advanced seminar we will undertake an in-depth study of different aspects of the surviving corpus of Aeschylus (including meter, dialect, narrative, thematics, plot-construction, and ritual context), while placing it in a comparative context of early forms of drama and varieties of choral performance attested across the world. In addition to discussing all of Aeschylus’s surviving works in English translation, we will read at least two of his plays in Greek (most likely, Agamemnon and Seven Against Thebes). We will also read important scholarship on Aeschylus. Advanced knowledge of Greek is a prerequisite.  B. Maslov. Spring

44515.  Money and the Ancient Greek World. (=CLCV 24515, CLAS 34515) The ancient Greek world saw an innovation the consequences of which are still familiar to everyone: coinage. This was first a currency of precious metal. But the ancient Greek world also saw the invention of fiduciary money. This class will examine the special forms taken by money in the ancient Greek world. It will give an introduction to Greek numismatics. Above all, it will analyze the policies of the states towards coinage, as well as the philosophical debates to which the specific forms of money gave rise in the ancient Greek world. Ancient texts will be analyzed both in original language and in translation. A. Bresson. Spring.

45715.  Seminar: Ghosts, Demons and Supernatural Danger in the Ancient World. (=ANCM 45715, HREL 45715)  This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduate students in the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the ancient discourses on and the ritual remedies for supernatural danger in Persian, Greek, Norse, Roman and other cultures.  The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students, by arrangement with the instructor,  will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter  and write a shorter paper or take-home exam.   C. Faraone & B. Lincoln.  Winter.

45913. Sem: Ancient medical writings in context.  (=CLAS, 35913, BIBL 45913). Ancient medicine is intimately linked with philosophical investigation. From the beginning, it fed philosophical theory as well as adapted it to its own use. It also offers a valuable insight into how ordinary humans lived their lives. Medical practice takes us into the homes of the Greeks and Romans, while shedding light on their fears and aspirations. The extant literature is voluminous. There is, first of all, the Hippocratic corpus, a diverse collection of medical writings that drew inspiration from the reputed founder of scientific medicine, Hippocrates. These writings offer a unique insight into the first stages of the creation of a science. Later, Galen established the foundation of Western medicine by his brilliant dissections. As it happens, he was extremely voluble; and he took care to have his spoken words passed on in writing. As a result, we learn much more than just medical theory: we know how physicians competed with one another, and how they related to their patients. In sum, this seminar will study a selection of medical writings, conjointly with some philosophical and literary writings, in an attempt to gage the intellectual and social significance of ancient medicine. Some knowledge of Greek will be useful. E. Asmis. Autumn.

47415. Atheism and the Greeks. Was atheism and invention of the eighteenth century? Noone in the eighteenth century thought so. This series of seminars will explore anew a series of key texts in the history of ancient atheism (including Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, the ’Sisyphus fragment’, book X of Plato’s Laws, Lucretius and Lucian) in the quest for the atheists of Greek antiquity. How widespread was the phenomenon? Was it at all coherent? What were the differences between its ancient and modern varieties?  T. Whitmarsh.  Autumn.

49000. Prospectus Workshop. A workshop for students who have completed coursework and qualifying exams, it aims to provide practical assistance and a collaborative environment for students preparing the dissertation prospectus. It will meet bi-weekly for two quarters. M. Payne. Autumn, Winter

 

Greek

21700/31700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. PQ: GREK 20300 or equivalent. This course will examine instances of Greek lyric genres throughout the archaic and classical periods, focusing on the structure, themes and sounds of the poetry and investigating their performative and historical contexts. Readings will include Alcman, Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon, Ibycus, Alcaeus, Simonides, Bacchylides, Pindar and Timotheus. In Greek. S. Nooter. Autumn.

21800/31800. Greek Epic: Apollonius. This course is a reading of Book 3 of the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. We consider character, story world, and the presence of the poet as we endeavor to understand what has become of epic poetry in the hands of its Hellenistic inheritors. C. Faraone.  Spring.

22500/32500.  Greek Historians.  PQ.  GREK 20300 or equivalent: Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text.  D. Martinez. Autumn.

23815/33815.  The Epistle to the Hebrews and the Epistle of Barnabas (=BIBL 46804). Tertullian was the first to attribute the authorship of the Epistle to the Hebrews to Barnabas, and that ascription found favor with no less an ancient figure as Jerome, and even with notable scholars of the late nineteenth and early 20th centuries, such as Albrecht Ritschl and Friedrich Blass. Although no one can know who wrote it, there are fruitful literary and thematic parallels between the Epistle that bears the name Barnabas and the canonical Hebrews, including their critique of Judaism and their interpretatio Christiana of the Hebrew Bible, with particular regard to Levitical institutions and the temple. We will read thoroughly the Greek text of each treatise with focus on the language and style of the two texts, their relation to Hellenistic Judaism, and their respective treatments of Hebrew Bible/Septuagintal themes. PreRec: at least three years of Greek.  D. Martinez.  Autumn.

23915/33915. The Greek Magical Papyri (=BIBL 45603). We will read a number of spells in Greek from the enigmatic corpus, which is known as the Papyri Graecae Magicae. We will focus particularly on the language of these documents, their descriptions of the praxeis of magical rituals, and their valuable contributions to the religious historical perspectives. Where appropriate, we will draw attention to parallels with early Christian texts and ideas. PreRec: at least three years of Greek  D. Martinez. Winter.

32700. Survey of Greek Literature-1.  We will cover Greek poetry, including drama, from Homer to Callimachus. Classes will be concerned chiefly with genre, style, meter, and literary tropes with some discussion of the scholarly history on these texts. There will be some close study of passages chosen to exemplify problems of interpretation or to display the major themes in each poet’s work. S. Nooter.  Autumn.

32800. Survey of Greek Literature-2. A study of the creation of the canonical Greek prose style in the 5th and 4th centuries. Rapid reading and translation exercises. H. Dik. Spring.

33900. Ancient Greek Hymns.  (=GREK 43900) We will study the evolution of Greek hymns from the Homeric Hymns and the earliest epigraphic evidence down to the hymns of Callimachus and the cult hymns to Isis in the Hellenistic period, including as well choral hymns in archaic lyric and Greek tragedy. C. Faraone. Spring.

34400.  Greek Prose Composition.  This course focuses on intensive study of the structures of the Greek language and the usage of the canonical Greek prose, including compositional exercises.  E. Asmis.  Winter.

35000.  Mastering Greek.  Mastering Greek is an intensive Greek language course for pre-professional Hellenists. Do you find yourself fudging accents sometimes? Wondering about the use of infinitives versus participles? Pondering the future less vivid? Is there a past contrary-to-fact in Greek? (No.) This course will review your Attic Greek from the level of the word to the short paragraph, leaving matters of style to Prose Composition (Winter). Recommended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, especially those who aspire to teach Greek. Assignments will include extensive written homework in Attic Greek, analytic exercises, and regular quizzes in order to advance to strong, active mastery of the language. H. Dik. Autumn.

35615.  History of the Greek Language.  (=GREK 25615) Greek is one of the oldest continuously written languages: we have testimonies of it across three millennia. This course will review the various stages of this language from its first written texts (Mycenaean Greek) to Medieval and Modern Greek, including the Greek dialects, the rise of the Koiné, Biblical Greek, and the contact of Greek with other languages through history. We will read and discuss texts from all phases, including literary texts, epigraphy, papyri and medieval manuscripts. Two years previous study of Greek is a requirement for enrolment. S. Torallas-Tovar. Winter.

36100. Introduction to Papyrology. (=BIBL 44300, GREK 26100) This course will concentrate on the methods and perspectives of the discipline of papyrology, including the "hands on" experience of working with actual texts in Chicago's collections of documents in Regenstein and Oriental Institute and the Ptolemaic collection at the University of Texas at Austin.  No previous knowledge of the field is assumed; we will begin from ground up.  Among the topics we will cover are: the major branches of papyrology (including documentary, literary, magical, and Christian texts), including analysis of the form and structure of different kinds of papyrus documents; the linguistic phenomenon of koine Greek; and the contribution of papyrology to other areas of the study of antiquity such as literature, social history, linguistics, and religion.  D. Martinez. Winter.

36615.  Lucian. (=GREK 26615) Lucian’s works offer critical perspectives on Hellenic identity and the hypocrisies of intellectual life in the Roman Empire. Several of his works will be read in Greek, and others will be read in translation. These will be paired with works by other authors who held perspectives similar to his: an epigram by Meleager of Gadara, fragments from the autobiography of Nicolaus of Damascus, and short selections from Tatian’s Against the Greeks. The critical perspectives of these authors, all of them from the Near Eastern provinces of the empire, will also be situated with respect to mainstream figures of the ‘Second Sophistic’ as constructed by Philostratus.  J. Secord.  Winter.

43900. Sem: Ancient Greek Hymns.  (=GREK 33900) We will study the evolution of Greek hymns from the Homeric Hymns and the earliest epigraphic evidence down to the hymns of Callimachus and the cult hymns to Isis in the Hellenistic period, including as well choral hymns in archaic lyric and Greek tragedy. C. Faraone. Spring.
 

Latin:

21700/31700. Post-Vergilian Epic. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. Lucan. In this class we will read the Achilleid of Statius. We will focus on the poetics of the prequel, and the themes of maternity, boyhood, and the role of the nonhuman in the education of the young Achilles. We will also look at some accounts of the affective appeal of Homer’s Achilles, and ask what the Achilleid is trying to bring out about him. M. Payne.  Autumn.

21800/31800. Roman History: Tacitus. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. Primary readings are drawn from the later books of the Annals, especially book 11, in which Tacitus describes the reign of Claudius and early reign of Nero. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative. C. Ando. Winter.

21900/31900. Roman Comedy. (=TAPS 28425) Plautus' Pseudolus is read in Latin, along with secondary readings that explain the social context and the theatrical conventions of Roman comedy.   Class meetings are devoted less to translation than to study of the language, plot construction, and stage techniques at work in the Pseudolus. P. White. Spring.

23400/33400. Boethius Consolation of Philosophy. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. The Consolation of Philosophy, which Boethius wrote in prison after a life of study and public service, offers a view on Roman politics and culture after Rome ceased to be an imperial capital. The Consolation is also a poignant testament from a man divided between Christianity and philosophy. About 70 pages of the text are read in Latin, and all of it in English. Secondary readings provide historical and religious context for the early sixth century AD. P. White. Spring.

24615/34615.  Augustine:  Early Philosophical Works.  Among Augustine's earliest surviving works are a collection of dialogues and essays inquiring into the nature of semiosis, religious epistemology, and self-knowledge.  Primary readings will be drawn from De Magistro, Contra Academicos, and Soliloquia.  Readings in English and secondary literature will situate these texts in Augustine's biography and within the landscape of ancient intellectual history. C. Ando.  Spring

44615. Sem:   Augustine:  Early Philosophical Works.  Among Augustine's earliest surviving works are a collection of dialogues and essays inquiring into the nature of semiosis, religious epistemology, and self-knowledge.  Primary readings will be drawn from De Magistro, Contra Academicos, and Soliloquia.  Readings in English and secondary literature will situate these texts in Augustine's biography and within the landscape of ancient intellectual history. C. Ando.  Spring.