Undergraduate Courses Winter 2015

Undergraduate Courses, Winter 2015

Classical Civilization:

14113. Introduction to Roman Art and Archaeology. (=ARTH 14105) This course offers a survey of the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the founding of Rome in the eighth century BC to the Christianization of the Empire in the fourth century AD. Students will witness the transformation of Rome from a humble village of huts surrounded by marshland in central Italy into the centripetal force of a powerful Empire that spanned mind-bogglingly distant reaches of space and time. Throughout the course, we will consider how the built environments and artifacts produced by an incredible diversity of peoples and places can make visible larger trends of historical, political, and cultural change. What, we will begin and end by asking, is Roman about Roman art? P. Crowley. Winter.

 20800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. (=HIST 16800) This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community. C. Hawkins, Staff. Winter.

21415. The Poems of Ovid. (=FNDL 21416). Publius Ovidius Naso was the most prolific of the major Latin poets, and by far the most influential classical author from the Middle Ages to early modernity.  This course includes reading and discussion of all his surviving poetry: the Heroides, verse letters of mythological heroines to their lovers; the Amores, a collection of love elegies; the Art of Love, an erotodidactic manual on sex and love for women as well as men; the Cures for Love; the Metamorphoses, his masterpiece, an episodic and encylopedic epic of mythology and history; the Fasti, a poetic calendar of Roman rituals and festivals; the Tristia and Letters from the Black Sea, exile poems written after Ovid's banishment to Tomis; the Ibis, a poem of invective revenge; and short poems on women's cosmetics and fishing.  Discussion, while geared toward the interests of participants, will range over topics including: wit, affect, and embodiment; narrative and character; form and genre; tradition and innovation; classicism and excess; intimacy and cruelty; interspecies metamorphosis and the inner lives of gods, humans, animals, and plants; and poetic ambition, power, and self-fashioning.  No prerequisites.  No knowledge of Latin required.  All readings will be in English translation, but separate meetings can be arranged for those wishing to read Ovid in Latin. D. Wray. Winter.

21700. Archaeology for Ancient Historians. (=CLAS 31700, ##HIST 20901. 39800, ANCM 31700) This course is intended to act not as an introduction to Classical Archaeology but as a methods course illuminating the potential contribution of material cultural evidence to ancient historians while at the same time alerting them to the possible misapplications. Theoretical reflections on the relationship between history and archaeology will be interspersed with specific case-studies from the Graeco-Roman world. J. Hall. Winter.

21807. Greek Art and Archaeology. (=ARTH 14107) This course examines the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from ca. 1000 BCE – ca. 200 BCE. Participants will learn a lot of facts about the Greek world; they will see the Greeks emerge from poverty and anarchy to form a distinctive political and social system based on city-states, and they will see that system grow unstable and collapse. They will see the emergence of distinctive forms of sculpture, architecture, pottery, and urban design – many of which are still in use today. Along with these facts, they will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life. R. Neer. Spring.

22314. The Ancient Romans and Their “Religion”. (=RLST 22311) No knowledge of ancient languages required. Roman religion is very rarely accorded a place of prominence in the history of religions of Late Antiquity or the modern academic study of religion. Too often when Roman religion is acknowledged it is as part of a more general picture of Greco-Roman paganism’s decline in the wake of Christianity’s rise to power. The purpose of this course then is to consider how we might understand Roman religion as a discrete yet dynamic set of discourses, practices, communities, and institutions in the contexts of both the late antique religious world and the modern academic study of religion. To this end, this course will introduce students not only to the basic elements of Roman religious life, but also to the dominant scholarly models used to engage the ancient sources. Finally, at a more theoretical level, this course also will challenge students to think critically about how religion as a modern analytic category may or may not be useful in understanding ancient cultures. D. Durdin. Winter.

23915. Plato's Republic. (=PLSC 23915, PLSC 33915, FNDL 23915, CLAS 33915). Plato's Republic is often considered the greatest work of moral and political theory ever written. Plato's themes include justice, courage, moderation, the best political order, civic education, and the proper role of philosophy in politics. The impact of the Republic on later Roman, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and secular Western thought is unquestionably immense. But the Republic is endlessly rich. Readers to this day continue to discover within it new questions and alarming implications. Did Plato really consider the rule of philosopher 'kings' and 'queens' to be possible? Did he encourage forms of propaganda and eugenics in his ideal order? Was he a critical friend of democracy or its fiercest enemy? In the spirit of these questions, we approach the Republic with fresh eyes, analyzing its logic and drama with care, book-by-book, attentive also to the characters of Socrates and his young Athenian interlocutors. Vandiver. Winter.

24215. Roman Art II: Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture. (=ARTH 14215) Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. This course offers an introductory survey of the art and architecture of the Roman world starting from the beginning of the second century AD, when the Empire reached its point of greatest expansion. It then proceeds through a period of relative peace and prosperity before witnessing the effects of a political, social, and economic “crisis” of the third century AD, the adoption of Christianity as the state religion, and the tremendous consequences of moving the capital from Rome to Constantinople. Throughout the course, we will consider how the built environments and artifacts produced by an incredible diversity of peoples and places can make visible larger trends of historical, political, and cultural change. What, we will begin and end by asking, is Roman about Roman art? P. Crowley. Winter.

24914. Ancient Greek Magic. (=CLAS 34914) C. Faraone. Winter.

25800. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. (=HIST 15603, NEHC 20012) Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. H. Karateke. Winter.

27109. Forms of Lyric from Classical Antiquity to Postmodernism. (=CMLT 24501, SLAV 24501) Moving beyond the modern perception of lyric as an expression of the poet’s subjectivity, this course confronts the remarkable longevity of varieties of lyric that have remained in use over centuries and millennia, such as the hymn, ode, pastoral, elegy, epistle, and epigram. What kept these classical genres alive for so long and, conversely, what made them serviceable to poets working in very different cultural milieus? In an effort to develop a theory and a history of Western lyric genres, we will sample from the work of many poets, including Sappho, Horace, Ovid, Hölderlin, Pushkin, Whitman, Mandel’shtam, Brodsky, and Milosz. All readings in English. B. Maslov. Winter.

28614. Cicero on Friendship and Aging (3-credit course)  (=CLAS 38614, LATN 2/38614, PHIL 2/34208, LAWS 52403, RETH ) Two of Cicero’s most enduring works are De Amicitia (On Friendship) and De Senectute (On Old Age).  We will read the entirety of both works in Latin and study their relationship to Cicero’s thought and life.  Other readings in translation will include related works of Cicero and quite a few of his letters to Atticus and other friends.The first hour of each course meeting will be devoted to translation, the rest to discussion, in order to give opportunities for auditors who are reading in translation. The requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and a paper.  Anyone from anywhere in the university may register if you meet the prerequisite.This is a Latin course that presupposes five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others interested in taking it may register for an Independent Study and have different requirements, more writing and no Latin, but they will take a final exam (different).  Tuesday, 3:00-5:45 p.m., Room B at the Law School.  M. Nussbaum.  Winter

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29800. B.A. Paper Seminar. PQ: Fourth-year standing. This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their B.A. paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their B.A. papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the B.A. Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the B.A. paper and, therefore, is not reported until the B.A. paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the B.A. paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn Quarter or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters. Autumn, Winter.

Greek:

10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II: Prose. PQ: GREK 10100. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. Winter.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 11100. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. H. Dik. Winter.

20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history. H. Dik. Winter.

22500/32500. Greek Historians: Herodotus. PQ: GREK 20300 or consent of instructor. Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text. D. Martinez. Winter.

261000/36100.  Introduction to Papyrology (=BIBL 44300) PQ: at least three years of Greek (or by consent of instructor)  This course will concentrate on the methods and perspectives of the discipline of papyrology, including the "hands on" experience of working with actual texts in Chicago's collections of documents in Regenstein and Oriental Institute and the Ptolemaic collection at the University of Texas at Austin.  No previous knowledge of the field is assumed; we will begin from ground up.  Among the topics we will cover are: the major branches of papyrology (including documentary, literary, magical, and Christian texts), including analysis of the form and structure of different kinds of papyrus documents; the linguistic phenomenon of koine Greek; and the contribution of papyrology to other areas of the study of antiquity such as literature, social history, linguistics, and religion. D. Martinez. Winter.

28214. Herodotus in Greek (=GREK 38214, SCTH 31925). A close study of Herodotus text with special attention to stylistics. J. Redfield. Winter.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter.

Modern Greek:

10200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200, MOGK 30200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Latin:

10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 10100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 10100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose. Texts in Latin. M. Allen. Winter.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 11100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin. P. White. Winter.

20200. Intermediate Latin II: Aeneid. PQ: LATN 20200 or equivalent. This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil’s language, versification, and literary art. Students are also required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation.  M. Payne. Winter.

22100/32100. Lucretius. We read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry is: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth. E. Asmis. Winter.

28614. Cicero on Friendship and Aging. (=PHIL 24208/34208, FNDL 24208, LAWS 52403, RETH 38614)  This is a Latin course that presupposes five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others interested in taking it may register for an Independent Study and have different requirements, more writing and no Latin, but they will take a final exam (different). Two of Cicero’s most enduring works are De Amicitia (On Friendship) and De Senectute (On Old Age).  We will read the entirety of both works in Latin and study their relationship to Cicero’s thought and life.  Other readings in translation will include related works of Cicero and quite a few of his letters to Atticus and other friends. The first hour of each course meeting will be devoted to translation, the rest to discussion, in order to give opportunities for auditors who are reading in translation.  The requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and a paper.  Anyone from anywhere in the university may register if you meet the prerequisite. Winter. M. Nussbaum.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.