Graduate Courses Winter 2015

Graduate Courses, Winter 2015

Classics:

31700. Archaeology for Ancient Historians. (=CLCV 21700, ##HIST 20901. 39800, ANCM 31700) This course is intended to act not as an introduction to Classical Archaeology but as a methods course illuminating the potential contribution of material cultural evidence to ancient historians while at the same time alerting them to the possible misapplications. Theoretical reflections on the relationship between history and archaeology will be interspersed with specific case-studies from the Graeco-Roman world. J. Hall. Winter.

33915. Plato's Republic. (=PLSC 23915, PLSC 33915, FNDL 23915, CLCV 23915). Plato's Republic s often considered the greatest work of moral and political theory ever written. Plato's themes include justice, courage, moderation, the best political order, civic education, and the proper role of philosophy in politics. The impact of the Republic on later Roman, Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and secular Western thought is unquestionably immense. But the Republic is endlessly rich. Readers to this day continue to discover within it new questions and alarming implications. Did Plato really consider the rule of philosopher 'kings' and 'queens' to be possible? Did he encourage forms of propaganda and eugenics in his ideal order? Was he a critical friend of democracy or its fiercest enemy? In the spirit of these questions, we approach the Republic with fresh eyes, analyzing its logic and drama with care, book-by-book, attentive also to the characters of Socrates and his young Athenian interlocutors. Vandiver. Winter.

34914. Ancient Greek Magic. (=CLAS 24914) C. Faraone. Winter.

35014. History, Happiness and Hellenism: Introduction to Reading Winckelmann. (=SCTH 35000). We approach the first great modern art historian through reading his classic early and mature writings and through the art and criticism of his time (and at the end, ours). Reading-intensive, with a field trip if time allows. A. Pop. Winter.

38614. Cicero on Friendship and Aging (3-credit course).  (=CLCV 28614, LATN 2/38614, PHIL 2/34208, LAWS 52403, RETH ) Two of Cicero’s most enduring works are De Amicitia (On Friendship) and De Senectute (On Old Age).  We will read the entirety of both works in Latin and study their relationship to Cicero’s thought and life.  Other readings in translation will include related works of Cicero and quite a few of his letters to Atticus and other friends. The first hour of each course meeting will be devoted to translation, the rest to discussion, in order to give opportunities for auditors who are reading in translation. The requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and a paper.  Anyone from anywhere in the university may register if you meet the prerequisite. This is a Latin course that presupposes five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others interested in taking it may register for an Independent Study and have different requirements, more writing and no Latin, but they will take a final exam (different). Tuesday, 3:00-5:45 p.m., Room B at the Law School. M. Nussbaum.  Winter. 

43114. Seminar: Greek Cult in Historical Context: Personal Experiences of the Divine. (=ANCM 43114, HIST 70704) This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts of ancient Greek cults that offered more intimate contact with the divine – for example, oracular rites, healing rituals, and mystery cults. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter by arrangement with the instructors. Enrollment is a prerequisite for participation in a research trip to Greece, planned for September 2015. C. Faraone & J. Hall. Winter.

49000. Prospectus Workshop. A workshop for students who have completed coursework and qualifying exams, it aims to provide practical assistance and a collaborative environment for students preparing the dissertation prospectus. It will meet bi-weekly for two quarters. M. Lowrie. Autumn, Winter.

Greek:

32500. Greek Historians: Herodotus. PQ: GREK 20300 or consent of instructor. Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text. D. Martinez. Winter.

36100.  Introduction to Papyrology (=BIBL 44300) PQ: at least three years of Greek (or by consent of instructor)  This course will concentrate on the methods and perspectives of the discipline of papyrology, including the "hands on" experience of working with actual texts in Chicago's collections of documents in the Regenstein Library and the Oriental Institute and the Ptolemaic collection at the University of Texas at Austin.  No previous knowledge of the field is assumed; we will begin from the ground up.  Among the topics we will cover are: the major branches of papyrology (including documentary, literary, magical, and Christian texts), including analysis of the form and structure of different kinds of papyrus documents; the linguistic phenomenon of koine Greek; and the contribution of papyrology to other areas of the study of antiquity such as literature, social history, linguistics, and religion. D. Martinez. Winter.

38214. Herodotus in Greek. (=SCTH 31925). A close study of Herodotus text with special attention to stylistics. J. Redfield. Winter.

Modern Greek:

30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200, MOGK 11200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Latin:

32100. Lucretius. We read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry is: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth. E. Asmis. Winter.

32800. Survey of Latin Literature II (Prose). With emphasis on major trends in modern critical interpretations of the major figures. E. Asmis. Winter.

38614. . Cicero on Friendship and Aging. (=PHIL 24208/34208, FNDL 24208, LAWS 52403, RETH 38614)  This is a Latin course that presupposes five quarters of Latin or the equivalent preparation. Others interested in taking it may register for an Independent Study and have different requirements, more writing and no Latin, but they will take a final exam (different). Two of Cicero’s most enduring works are De Amicitia (On Friendship) and De Senectute (On Old Age).  We will read the entirety of both works in Latin and study their relationship to Cicero’s thought and life.  Other readings in translation will include related works of Cicero and quite a few of his letters to Atticus and other friends. The first hour of each course meeting will be devoted to translation, the rest to discussion, in order to give opportunities for auditors who are reading in translation.  The requirements include a midterm, a final exam, and a paper.  Anyone from anywhere in the university may register if you meet the prerequisite. Winter. M. Nussbaum.

PAMW:

43114. Seminar: Greek Cult in Historical Context: Personal Experiences of the Divine. (=CLAS 43114, HIST 70704) This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts of ancient Greek cults that offered more intimate contact with the divine – for example, oracular rites, healing rituals, and mystery cults. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter by arrangement with the instructors. Enrollment is a prerequisite for participation in a research trip to Greece, planned for September 2015. C. Faraone & J. Hall. Winter.