Graduate Courses Autumn 2014

Graduate Courses, Autumn 2014

Classics:

31200. History and Theory of Drama I. (=ENGL 13800, CLCV 21200, CMLT 20500, CMLT 30500, ENGL 31000, TAPS 28400) Preference given to students with third- or fourth-year standing. May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. The course is a survey of major trends and theatrical accomplishments in drama from the ancient Greeks through the Renaissance: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, classical Sanskrit theater, medieval religious drama, Japanese Noh drama, Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Molière, along with some consideration of dramatic theory by Aristotle, Sir Philip Sidney, Corneille, and others. Students have the option of writing essays or putting on short scenes in cooperation with other members of the course. The goal of these scenes is not to develop acting skill but, rather, to discover what is at work in the scene and to write up that process in a somewhat informal report. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended. D. Bevington. Autumn.

31415. Gender and Sexuality in Roman Art. (=ARTH 21415, ARTH 31415) In the remote, but omnipresent past of classical antiquity, what kinds of experiences and practices fell under the umbrella of terms and concepts that we moderns call “gender” and “sexuality”? This course explores the fundamentally visual aspect of this question by drawing attention first and foremost to works of Roman art, but also to topics such as the erotics of vision, the senses of shame and modesty, and bodily comportment. While the robust corpus of ancient and modern literature on these topics will constitute an important part of our discussions, we will likewise consider the ways in which ancient art provides forms of evidence that are analogous, but never coextensive, with that of ancient texts. Finally, taking a cue from Tom Stoppard’s play The Invention of Love (1997), in which A. E. Housman declares that the “barbarity” of homosexuality is that it’s “half Greek and half Latin,” we will attend to the ways in which the dynamics of gender and sexuality took shape in a historical continuum in which the lines between what was “Greek” and what was “Roman” became increasingly blurred. P. Crowley. Autumn.

32014.  The Reception of Philosophy in the Roman Period. (=BIBL 42014, CLAS 42014) The philosophy of the Greeks and Romans in the first century BCE and first two centuries CE has often been labeled "eclectic". This seminar will be an attempt to get away from this label. What we will focus on is the reception of earlier philosophy by a number of thinkers. On the Roman side, we will give attention to Cicero, Musonius, and Seneca; on the Greek side, we will read Dio of Prusa, Plutarch, and Galen. Each of these thinkers developed an approach of his own, consisting in a transformation of past ideas. The seminar will investigate what is new about each approach. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required. E. Asmis. Autumn.

 

32514. Markets and Moral Economies in the Roman Empire. (=CLCV 22514) This course examines the ways in which economic behavior in the Roman Empire was informed by, and itself came to inform, social and religious mores and practices. We will explore the interrelationship between culture and economy from the accession of Augustus to late antiquity and the conversion of the empire to Christianity. Particular attention will be given to Roman attitudes towards labor, the ethical issues surrounding buying and selling, and alternative allocative mechanisms to the market. Of constant concern will be the tension between the perspectives and prejudices of elites, which stand behind so much surviving literary evidence, and the realities of everyday commerce and economic life as they can be glimpsed in the archaeological and epigraphic record. L. Gardnier. Autumn.

34306. Byzantine Empire, 330-610. (=HIST 21701, HIST 31701, CLCV 24306) A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the formation of early Byzantine government, society, and culture. Although a survey of event and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. There will be some discussion of relevant archaeology and topography. No prerequisite. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

34506. Alexander the Great. (=HIST 20802, HIST 30802, CLCV 24506) This course provides both a survey of the career of Alexander the Great and an introduction to the historiographical traditions (ancient and modern) that shape our understanding of his legacy. We will focus primarily on two clusters of problems. First, we will examine what Alexander’s career can tell us about the dynamics of ancient empires. Second, we will grapple with the interpretative challenges generated by our evidence, which consists largely of literary accounts produced by authors who wrote long after Alexander’s own lifetime and who relied on earlier texts that no longer survive. All sources will be read in translation. C. Hawkins. Autumn.

35513. Anagnorisis and the Cognitive Work of Theater. (=GRMN 26913, CLCV 25513, CMLT 26913, CMLT 36913, TAPS 28441, GRMN 36913) In the Poetics Aristotle conceives anagnorisis or recognition as one of the three constitutive parts of the dramatic plot and defines it as the “a change from ignorance (agnoia) to knowledge (gnosis).” Implying the rediscovery of something previously known anagnorisis refers to the employment and staging of a certain kind of cognitive work characteristic of theater (as a locus of theoria or theory). For recognition is not only required of the dramatis personae on stage but also of the spectators who need to (re)-cognize a character whenever s/he enters. Just as the characters’ anagnorisis isn’t restricted to the filiation, i.e., identity, of other characters the audience’s cognition concerns the understanding the plot as a whole. In short, by focusing on anagnorisis we can gain insight in the specific cognitive work of theater (and drama). Naturally we will begin in antiquity and examine the instantiation of recognition in Homer’s Odyssey and several Greek tragedies as well as its first theorization in Aristotle’s Poetics. Then we will jump to the modernes, specifically Enlightenment theater’s obsession with anagnorisis and the cognitive work it performs, and investigate dramas by Diderot and Lessing. Kleist’s dramatic deconstructions of German bourgeois and classical theater test the Enlightenment’s claim to reason and reform of human cognition. Our last stop will be Brecht’s theater of “Entfremdung” that makes the alienation at the heart of anagnorisis into the centerpiece of his aesthetic and political project. If we have time, we will also take a look at comical recognition as self-reflection of its tragic counterpart. Readings and discussions in English. C. Wild. Autumn.

36514.  Travel and Pilgrimage in the Roman Empire. (=CLCV 26514, NEHC 2/36514) This course will take a trip around the Roman Empire, exploring the different motivations and contexts for travel in Antiquity. Through surviving literary texts we will survey varieties of travel, including military campaigns, scientific exploration, conquest, commerce and piracy, economic displacement, pilgrimage, and even tourism. Stops in different provinces of the Empire will provide geographical information as well as details about the practicalities of travel: vessels, caravans and other means, cost of travel, infrastructure at the traveller’s disposal, maritime and land routes, safe-conducts, guidebooks and language aids for the traveller. Along the way, the course will also provide an introduction to the diversity and uniformity of the Roman Empire. S. Torallas Tovar. Autumn.

37413.  Historical Theological Debates: Predestination and the Augustinian Legacy in the Carolingian Era. (=HCHR 45010/THEO 45010) The Carolingian era (750-875CE) saw a number of important theological debates. The debate on predestination, which involves the legacy of Augustine, is perhaps the most important one. It inspired a number of Carolingian intellectuals to produce among their finest writing, including: Gottschalk of Orbais, Johannes Scottus Eriugena, Hincmar of Rheims, Lupus of Ferrières, and Florus of Lyon. In this seminar we will try to get at what is at stake for the Carolingian intellectuals who take up this difficult topic. We will look to the theological issues involved, especially grace and free will, to the socio-cultural background and intellectual milieu of the contributing authors and to the aftermath of the debate in 17th-century Jansenism. M. Allen & W. Otten. Autumn.

42014.  The Reception of Philosophy in the Roman Period. (=BIBL 42014, CLAS 32014) The philosophy of the Greeks and Romans in the first century BCE and first two centuries CE has often been labeled "eclectic". This seminar will be an attempt to get away from this label. What we will focus on is the reception of earlier philosophy by a number of thinkers. On the Roman side, we will give attention to Cicero, Musonius, and Seneca; on the Greek side, we will read Dio of Prusa, Plutarch, and Galen. Each of these thinkers developed an approach of his own, consisting in a transformation of past ideas. The seminar will investigate what is new about each approach. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required. E. Asmis. Autumn.

43014. Seminar: Greek Cult in Historical Context: Personal Experiences of the Divine. (=ANCM 43014, HIST 70703) This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts of ancient Greek cults that offered more intimate contact with the divine – for example, oracular rites, healing rituals, and mystery cults. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter by arrangement with the instructors. Enrollment is a prerequisite for participation in a research trip to Greece, planned for September 2015. C. Faraone & J. Hall. Autumn.

47414. Physis and the Natures of Nature in Greco-Roman Antiquity. (=SCTH 47414, CHSS 47414) The question of the nature of nature is present in Greek literature from the beginning.  In Book 10 of the Odyssey, Odysseus encounters Hermes, who gives him a plant, moly, capable of protecting against Circe’s theriomorphizing powers, and then reveals the plant’s physis.  The idea of physis as an object of revelation is a Leitmotif in the inquiries into nature that take hold in the sixth century all the way through to late antiquity.  What is being brought to light, however, is by no means stable.  Nor are the various natures of antiquity easily reconciled with our notion of nature.  Nevertheless, in the rich and varied Greco-Roman appeals to and solicitations of nature, we confront conceptual habits that persist in our current imagination of nature and the natural world.

This course takes up the question of the natures of nature in Greco-Roman antiquity from the angles of natural history, cosmology, medicine, ethics, and literature.  We’ll focus on a handful of possible entry points into a tangled and vast semantic web, guided by the term physis but not restricted to its domains.  Over the course of the term we will consider the following topis: the order and agency of the natural world in Greek literature; the relationship between physis, occult knowledge, and techniques of manifestation; human nature and the tension between physis as a force of compulsion and a norm to be fulfilled; strategies for controlling nature; the affective dimensions of landscape; the relationship between the natures of things and a single ordering nature; atomism and continuum theories of matter; and transcendence and immanence within philosophies of nature. B. Holmes. Autumn.

49000. Prospectus Workshop. A workshop for students who have completed coursework and qualifying exams, it aims to provide practical assistance and a collaborative environment for students preparing the dissertation prospectus. It will meet bi-weekly for two quarters. M. Lowrie. Autumn, Winter.

Ancient Greek:

32400. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. (=GREK 22400) PQ: GREK 20600 or equivalent. We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Frogs, a play widely admired as an early instance of clever literary criticism and creative metatheatricality that brings its audience into the underworld and suggests several fantasies of salvation, a play whose production marks the end of the great century of Greek drama. Reading will include translation as well as secondary readings. S. Nooter. Autumn.

 

Modern Greek:

30100. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I. (=LGLN 11100, MOGK 11100) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Autumn.

Latin:

32300. Roman Oratory. Two of Cicero's speeches for the defense in the criminal courts of Rome receive a close reading in Latin and in English.The speeches are in turn considered in relation to Cicero's rhetorical theory as set out in the De Oratore and in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome. P. White. Autumn.

32700. Survey of Latin Literature I (Poetry). We shall read extended selections from prose writers of recognized importance to the Latin tradition. Our sampling of texts will emphasize writers of the Late Republic and Early Principate. D. Wray. Autumn.

34400. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students’ awareness of the classical artists’ skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. S. Bartsch-Zimmer. Autumn.

PAMW:

43014. Seminar: Greek Cult in Historical Context: Personal Experiences of the Divine. (=CLAS 43014, HIST 70703) This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduates in History and the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts of ancient Greek cults that offered more intimate contact with the divine – for example, oracular rites, healing rituals, and mystery cults. The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter by arrangement with the instructors. Enrollment is a prerequisite for participation in a research trip to Greece, planned for September 2015. C. Faraone & J. Hall. Autumn.