Degree Requirements (up to 2011–2012)

These are the degree requirements through the 2011–2012 academic year. Please see the current degree requirements for the Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures.

A.M. Degree in Classical Languages and Literatures

Candidates who do not already possess an A.M. in Classical Languages and Literatures must:

  1. Take diagnostic examinations in Greek and Latin in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter. On the basis of these results, the Graduate Adviser will discuss individual candidates' specific linguistic needs and suggest a program of study designed to enable the student to pass the first language competency examination at the end of the first year.
  2. Pass, with an average grade no lower than B, one three-quarter sequence devoted to rapid reading of Greek or Latin texts and to a survey of Greek or Latin literature. Two quarters will be devoted to rapid reading of suitable texts with emphasis on grammar and translation skills. One quarter will be devoted to the history of, and current critical issues in, Greek or Latin literature; a paper or its equivalent will normally be required. A competency examination in the language of the survey will be set at the end of the spring quarter. Candidates who fail this examination will be given one further chance to pass it in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter.
  3. Complete, with a grade no lower than B, at least two quarters of departmental seminar work (400-level courses in Greek, Latin or Classics), with emphasis on scholarly research and writing, resulting in two research papers; two seminar research papers, selected by the student, are to be placed in his or her file. (One two-quarter seminar resulting in a single paper fulfills this requirement.)
  4. Complete, with a grade no lower than B, one course above the 206 level in the language other than the language of the survey offered in satisfaction of the A.M. requirement.
  5. Pass the prose composition course in Greek or Latin.
  6. Attend a series of Methods Workshops, held throughout the year.
  7. Demonstrate competence in the reading of either French or German.
  8. Satisfy any other divisional requirements.

Students coming to the Department with an A.M. in Classics from another university must:

  1. Take diagnostic examinations in Greek and Latin in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter. Should the student not demonstrate sufficient fluency on the diagnostics, he or she will be required to take all three quarters of both survey courses; the student will in any case be required to take the third quarter of one survey course and all three quarters of the other. Competency examinations in the language of the survey will be set at the end of the spring quarter and should be taken by candidates, even if they have been exempted from two quarters of the survey.
  2. Either satisfy the seminar requirement for the A.M. (see item 2 under A.M. Degree in Classics, above) or be exempted from the requirement. To be exempted a student must submit two seminar research papers to the graduate advisor(s), who will decide whether or not they satisfy the requirement.
  3. Pass the prose composition course in Greek or Latin.
  4. Attend a series of Methods Workshops, held throughout the year.
  5. Demonstrate competence in the reading of either French or German.
  6. Satisfy any other divisional requirements.

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Advancement to the Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures

To be advanced to the Ph.D. program, candidates must:

  1. Complete course work as specified for the A.M. in Classical Languages and Literatures, above. These requirements should be fulfilled preferably before the end of the first year of residence. In any case, all requirements from the first year, including incompletes in any courses required for the A.M. in Classical Languages and Literatures must be completed no later than the first Monday of Autumn Quarter. Students who do not meet this deadline will be placed on academic probation until the requirement is met (see below).
  2. Pass the first language competency examination in Greek or Latin set at the end of the spring quarter of their first year. Candidates who fail the language competency examination will be given one further chance to pass it in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter. Failure to pass a second time will result in the termination of the student’s enrollment at the end of the second year.

Scholastic Residence Requirements.

Once advanced to the Ph.D. program, candidates must satisfy the following requirements:

  1. Pass, with an average grade no lower than B, the second three-quarter sequence (rapid reading and survey) in Greek or Latin literature. A second competency examination in the language of the survey will be set at the end of the spring quarter. Candidates who fail the language competency examination will be given one further chance to take it in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter.
  2. Complete, with a grade no lower than B, two more quarters of departmental seminar work
  3. Complete, with a grade no lower than B, at least two courses that are not text/author courses. Such courses are to be selected from history, philosophy, epigraphy, art, comparative literature, palaeography, linguistics, anthropology, religion, or the like.
  4. Pass the second prose composition course. 
  5. Attend a series of Methods Workshops, held throughout the year.

Advancement to Scholastic Residence years 3 & 4.

To be advanced to Scholastic Residence 3, candidates must:

  1. Complete all course work as specified for the Scholastic Residence Requirements, above. These requirements should be fulfilled preferably before the end of the second year of residence and in any case no later than the first Monday of Autumn Quarter. Students who do not meet this deadline will be placed on academic probation until the requirement is met (see below).
  2. Pass the second language competency examination in Greek or Latin set at the end of the spring quarter of their second year. Candidates who fail the language competency examination will be given one further chance to take it in the week prior to the commencement of the Autumn Quarter. Failure to pass a second time will result in the termination of the student’s enrolment at the end of the following Spring Quarter.

Academic Probation

Students placed on academic probation are ineligible for teaching and assistantship positions and for any forms of additional fellowship money, such as an increase in their annual stipend or a Boyer or Ryerson Fellowship. Any student who remains on academic probation by the beginning of the fourth week of Spring Quarter will be discontinued from the program at the end of the academic year.

Candidacy for the Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures.

After advancement to Scholastic Residence years 3 & 4, candidates must:

  1. Pass two separate two-hour examinations in Greek and Roman History by the end of their third year sequence. Either requirement may also be met by: (i) passing, with a grade no lower than B, the first quarter of the two-quarter Seminar in Greek or Roman History respectively; (ii) passing, with a grade no lower than B, a 300-level course in Greek or Roman History for which the instructor will also set a short, supplementary general reading list; or (iii) attending a summer program offered by either the American School of Classical Studies in Athens or the American Academy in Rome.
  2. Pass, at the end of the third year of graduate study, a written examination on a Greek or Latin prose or verse text (complete or an excerpt) of the candidate's own choosing. The text should not exceed approximately 50 OCT pages, though it may be considerably shorter. The examination consists of essay-length responses (around 15 double-spaced pages each) to two questions to be undertaken within the period of five days. The examination must be preceded by a Special Field proposal, drafted by the candidate in consultation with his or her Advisory Committee, which should include (1) a short statement (approximately 1-2 pages) explaining the reasons for selecting the Special Field text and the particular issues on which the candidate wishes to focus and (2) a bibliography of relevant secondary material which the candidate undertakes to have read prior to the examination. (A benchmark for bibliography length is 50 items, where a book counts as two items and an article as one. Bibliography length will vary in individual cases.) The bibliography need not be exhaustive on the text or author but rather should be appropriate to the particular focus of the candidate's Special Field. In preparation for the examination, students will work with advisory committee members through meetings, written reports on reading, or both. The Special Field examination may (but need not) be related to the dissertation topic the candidate intends to pursue. It serves as an introduction to sustained independent research with an advisory committee and affords the candidate the opportunity either to start preliminary research toward the dissertation or to develop an additional area of interest and expertise.
  3. Demonstrate competence in the second modern language, either French or German, normally before the end of their third year of residence.
  4. Assemble a dissertation committee (normally three faculty members, of whom at least two must hold full-time appointments in the Classics Department) and submit a dissertation proposal, consisting of a prospectus of approximately 20-25 pages, including bibliography. While the prospectus is necessarily provisional and dissertations will evolve in different directions with further research and writing, the dissertation prospectus should present: (i) a succinct statement of the problem or topic to be addressed; (ii) a brief overview of the most important previous scholarship on the question; (iii) a clear articulation of the scholarly contribution that the dissertation will make; (iv) a brief account of the methodology or methodologies to be applied, with relevant examples; (v) a provisional outline of the dissertation’s contents and chapter organization; and (vi) a preliminary, working bibliography. The proposal should be submitted within one year of passing the Special Field Examination and will not be accepted if the candidate has not already passed the Special Field Examination, the Greek and Roman History examinations and the second modern language competency examination. For graduate students entering from Autumn Quarter 2012 onwards, the dissertation proposal must be submitted before the end of the fourth year of residency. The faculty will vote electronically whether to approve the proposal within two weeks of submission. Once approved, the candidate will be considered as advanced to Ph.D. candidacy.

After completing these requirements, the candidate is formally admitted to Ph.D. candidacy.

The Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures

To graduate with a Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures, a candidate must:

  1. Be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy.
  2. Complete the dissertation and defend it before the gathered members of the Department and interested faculty from other Departments.
  3. Satisfy any other Divisional or University Requirements.