Graduate Courses, 2016-17

Graduate Courses, 2016-17

Classics:

CLAS 30400. Who Were the Greeks? (=HIST 20701/30701, ANCM 30400, CLCV 20400) If the current resurgence of interest in ethnic studies is a direct reflection of a contemporary upsurge in ethnic conflict throughout the world, it remains the case that notions of peoplehood and belonging have been of periodic importance throughout history. This course will study the various expressions of Greek identity within shifting political, social, and cultural contexts from prehistory to the present day, though with a strong emphasis on classical antiquity. Particular attention will be given to theoretical issues such as anthropological definitions of ethnicity, the difference between ethnic and cultural identities, methods for studying ethnicity in historical societies, and the intersection of ethnicity with politics. J. Hall. Autumn.

CLAS 30516. Pompeii: Life, Death, and Afterlife of a Roman City. (=ARTH 20505/30505, CLCV 20516) This course takes an in-depth look at the exceptional and exceptionally preserved city of Pompeii (along with others in the Bay of Naples region including Herculaneum, Stabiae, and Oplontis) as a microcosm of the forms of Roman life in in the first century. In the late summer or early autumn of A.D. 79, Pompeii suffered a cataclysmic event when Mount Vesuvius exploded in a terrible and spectacular fashion, spewing forth a tremendous cloud of ash over the city. While the disaster claimed the lives of tens of thousands of inhabitants in the area, the peculiar conditions of the eruption preserved the material traces of their daily lives. Students will explore the civic, commercial, and domestic spaces of Pompeii including its forum, temples and sanctuaries, cemeteries, theaters, brothels, bakeries, and especially its townhouses, the latter of which were decorated with brilliant wall paintings, floor mosaics, furniture, and lush portico gardens designed to offer rest and relaxation from the bustle of city life. Significant attention will also be paid not only to the discovery of Pompeii and its neighboring towns in the 18th century, but also its reception in the archaeological and popular imagination up to the present. P. Cromley. Winter.

CLAS 31716. A Political History of the Ancient Kingdom of Greater Armenia (ca. 188 BCE – 428 CE). (=CLCV 21716) Generally speaking, the ancient kingdom of Great Armenia is a marginal entity within the fields of ancient history and archaeology, which attracted relatively few historians of antiquity. As a matter of fact, scholars of Antiquity usually refer to Armenia only when it was involved into one of the frequent military crises between East and West. The country had an important strategic position, a vast expanse of territory, and wealthy natural resources. This explains very well the efforts of the Seleucids and of Rome, and of the Iranian dynasties of the Parthians and the Sassanids, to establish a military control and cultural influence over Armenia. Both contacts with the West and the East shaped the complex identity of Armenia - a somewhat mixed identity which is rather difficult to study. Therefore, both Classical and Iranian scholars tend to neglect the role of Armenia, or to diminish its position in the balance of power: the anachronistic cliché of a Greater Armenia as a «buffer state» is still mentioned. Accordingly, the few specialists on pre-Christian Armenia hardly communicate with those other scholars. Therefore, the very marginality of the kingdom of Armenia has not stimulated neither Classical scholars, nor Iranian scholars, to show interest in Armenia as well.This course will present a comprehensive history of ancient Armenia, from its origins to the fall of the kingdom in 428 CE, in order to reconstruct the history of the Artaxiad and of the Arsacid dynasties within a geopolitical frame considering the role of Armenia between Rome and Iran. G. Traina. Spring.

CLAS 32800. Survey of Latin Literature I. This course is principally designed as a practical workshop to develop rapid reading of Latin poetry. We will read major poetic texts from Plautus to Lucan. D. Wray. Spring.

CLAS 32914. Italian Renaissance. (=HIST 12203, CLCV 22914) Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals. Dante, Machiavelli, Medici, and Borgia (1250–1600). With a focus on literature, primary sources, the recovery of lost texts, technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the church in renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome. A. Palmer. Autumn.

CLAS 33616. Homer’s Odyssey: Estrangement and Homecoming (=SCTH 31223). One of the two foundational epics of so-called Western Culture, the Odyssey features a wily hero whose journeys are extraordinary and whose longing for home is unbounded. The Odyssey offers a complex meditation on brotherhood, bestiality, sexuality, kinship, and power; it is the great epic of cross-cultural encounter, in all its seductive and violent aspects, as well as the great poem of marriage. An adventure in nostos (homecoming), the Odyssey shows us the pleasures and dangers of voyaging among strangers. Constantly exploring the boundaries between the civilized and the savage, the poem offers as well a political critique of many ancient institutions, not least the family patriarchy, hospitality customs, and the band-of-brothers so central to epic ideology. And as a masterwork of narrative art, the Odysseyasks us to consider the relation of fiction to “truth.” We will explore these and other matters in the Odyssey, and may make a concluding foray into contemporary re-workings of Odyssean themes and characters. L. Slatkin.

Time/day/location:  1:30-4:20pm, Mondays and Wednesdays, in Foster 305.
Open to undergrads with the permission of the instructor.
Please note: this course will be taught the first five weeks of the quarter (March 27 thru April 26, 2017).
 

CLAS 34716. Roman Philosophers on the Fear of Death. (=PHIL 20710/30710, LAWS 96305, CLCV 24716) All human beings fear death, and it seems plausible to think that a lot of our actions are motivated by it. But is it reasonable to fear death? And does this fear do good (motivating creative projects) or harm (motivating greedy accumulation, war, and too much deference to religious leaders)? Hellenistic philosophers, both Greek and Roman, were preoccupied with these questions and debated them with a depth and intensity that makes them still highly influential in modern philosophical debate about the same issues (the only issue on which one will be likely find discussion of Lucretius in the pages of The Journal of Philosophy). The course will focus on several major Latin writings on the topic: Lucretius De Rerum Natura Book III, and extracts from Cicero and Seneca. We will study the philosophical arguments in their literary setting and ask about connections between argument and its rhetorical expression. In translation we will read pertinent material from Plato, Epicurus, Plutarch, and a few modern authors such as Thomas Nagel, John Fischer, and Bernard Williams. Prerequisite: ability to read the material in Latin at a sufficiently high level, usually about two years at the college level. M. Nussbaum. Winter

CLAS 35116.  Athenian Empire. (=CLCV 25116). The Athenian Empire (477–404 BCE) is one of the most iconic empires of the past. Thucydides is famously a major source on Athen’s fifth century empire, the history of which is supposed to be well known. But how did the empire really work? A considerable new material has accumulated over the last decades. It allows us to revisit old debates but literally also to create new fields of investigation. The Athenian Empire should not anymore be analyzed in a purely political dimension. It should  also be read as a religious, social, financial and even economic construct. A comparative analysis with other imperial constructions is also much needed. This class will make use of a large body of literary, epigraphic, archaeological and numismatic sources. For all ancient Greek texts a translation will be provided, although the documents will also be available in original language. The class is open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
  A. Bresson. Winter.

CLAS 35516. Strabo’s World: Early Geographic Traditions. (=CLCV 25516) This course traces the emergence of geographic thought in the Mediterranean world and the diachronic representations of space and place that became the foundations for the humanistic and social science of geography. Discussions will examine the practices that led to diverse modes and styles of spatial expression, travel and mapping, the tensions between the known world and the exotic imagined other, and the political, social, and cultural dimensions of geographic works and their historical contexts. Beyond our sustained focus on Strabo, writing under the Roman Empire, we will explore and interrogate both earlier and later traditions, from Hecataeus and Herodotus to Dionysius and Pausanias. K. Kearns. Spring.

CLAS 35716. Egypt in Late Antiquity. (=NELC 20287/30287, CLCV 25716) Egypt in Late Antiquity was a melting pot of cultures, languages and religions. With the native Egyptians subject to a series of foreign masters (Greek and Roman), each with their own languages and religious practices, Egyptian society was marked by a rich and richly documented diversity. In this course we will pay special attention to the contact of languages and of religions. Discussing on the basis of primary sources in translation different aspects characteristic of this period: The crises of the Roman Empire and their effects in Egypt, the emergence of Christianity and the decline of paganism, and the development of monastic communities. The course will end at the Islamic conquest. S. Toralles-Tovar. Spring.

CLAS 36016. Epicureanism. (=BIBL 46016, CLCV 26016) Epicureanism had a wide impact on Greek and Roman culture as a materialist system of philosophy that advocated pleasure as the goal of life. Lucretius turned its teachings into a poem with the aim of converting his fellow Romans; and it continued to inspire many readers subsequently. This course will focus on the response to Epicureanism in both antiquity and later. Beginning with the age of Epicurus himself, we will consider how individuals used the teachings in the light of their own experience and needs. Our study will take us to the rediscovery of Lucretius in the Renaissance, as well as the origins of modern atomism and the humanism of the nineteenth century. E. Asmis. Winter.

CLAS 36616. The Ancient City: The Greek World. (=HIST 16601, CLCV 26616) This annually offered course focuses on the development and transformation of cities in the ancient Mediterranean world. Among the issues to be discussed are how one defines a city and whether ancient cities satisfy those definitional criteria; what factors account for the emergence of cities; and what elements give rise to a particularly urban way of life. Theoretical reflections will be interspersed with specific case-studies. This year the focus will be on the cities of the Greek world and will consider topics such as the relationship between the city and the polis and the degree to which Athens was a typical Greek city. J. Hall. Winter.

CLAS 37116. The Greek Countryside. (=CLCV 27116) This course explores the historic development and dynamics of the ancient Greek countryside (oikoumene, chora) alongside the emergence of the city (polis). Recent historical analyses of demography and economy, archaeological fieldwork, and research on the cultural lens of town/country are revealing a highly complex world surrounding the city walls. What are the benefits and potential interpretive challenges of investigating these places and their constituent actors? Discussions will question the construction of urban vs. non-urban categories of ancient life, agropastoral economies and markets, political and social boundaries, rural sanctuaries, diachronic change, and methods and theories for examining the countryside through material culture and textual evidence. K. Kearns. Autumn.

CLAS 37316. The Humanities as a Way of Knowing. (=SCTH 30925)   Despite intertwined histories and many shared practices, the contemporary humanities and sciences stand in relationships of contrast and opposition to one another. The perceived fissure between the “Two Cultures” has been deepened by the fact that the bulk of all history and philosophy of science has been devoted to the natural sciences. This seminar addresses the history and epistemology of what in the nineteenth century came to be called the “sciences” and the “humanities” since the Renaissance from an integrated perspective. The historical sources will focus on shared practices in, among others, philology, natural history, astronomy, and history. The philosophical source will develop an epistemology of the humanities: how humanists know what they know. L. Daston. Spring.

Time/Day/Location: 9:30a-12:20p, Mondays in Foster 305

It is an undergrad and grad course by consent of instructor.

CLAS 37716. Exemplary Leaders: Livy, Plutarch, and Machiavelli. (=PLSC 27703/47703, CLCV 27716, FNDL 27716) Cicero famously called history the “schoolmistress of life.” This course explores how ancient and early modern authors – in particular, Livy, Plutarch and Machiavelli – used the lives and actions of great individuals from the Greek and Roman past to establish models of political behavior for their own day and for posterity. Such figures include Solon, Lycurgus, Alexander, Romulus, Brutus, Camillus, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, Julius Caesar, and Augustus. We will consider how their actions are submitted to praise or blame, presented as examples for imitation or avoidance, and examine how the comparisons and contrasts established among the different historical individuals allow new models and norms to emerge. No one figure can provide a definitive model. Illustrious individuals help define values even when we mere mortals cannot aspire to reach their level of virtue or depravity. Course open to undergraduates and graduate students. Readings will be in English. Students wishing to read Latin, Greek, or Italian will receive support from the professors. M. Lowrie and J. McCormick. Winter.

CLAS 38716. The Roman Republic in Law and Literature. (=HIST 21007/31007, CLCV 28716) The class will study the history of the Roman republic in light of contemporary normative theory, and likewise interrogate the ideological origins of contemporary republicanism in light of historical concerns. The focus will be on sovereignty, public law, citizenship, and the form of ancient empire. C. Ando. Winter.

CLAS 41216. Aristophanes’ Clouds and Plato’s Gorgias.  (=SCTH 31926). An inquiry into Socrates based on two contrasting works. J. Redfield. Spring.

CLAS 41616. Federal States in Ancient Greece: Problems and Approaches. If ancient Greece was a world of city-states, it was also a world in which many communities developed strategies to overcome the limitations of a city-state political ecology, whether they were seeking asymmetrical power or mere survival. One such strategy was to federate—to create regional states comprised of multiple poleis as member states—an innovation of late sixth or early fifth century that became increasingly attractive and successful over the course of the fourth and third centuries. This course offers an introduction to the federal states of the ancient Greek world. Rather than conduct region-by-region examinations of the evidence, we will consider the various scholarly approaches to the topic and pose a series of questions about this kind of ancient state that we can explore through in-depth analysis of evidence from a wide array of instances. What role did group identity play in the formation of these states and their development over time? How did religion affect (and effect) regional politics? What impact did the formation of regional states have on regional economies, and was it intentional or an accidental byproduct of federation? Did Greek federal states avoid the “twin dilemmas” of federal politics posited by political scientists, and if so, how? Emily Mackil. Autumn

CLAS 44816. Greek Epigraphy: Private and Public Inscriptions of the Greek City-States. (=NELC 44916, HIST 50303) Greek inscriptions provide us a unique and specific approach to the ancient Greek world. This class will investigate both private and public inscriptions of the ancient Greek city states, from the Archaic to the Imperial period. It will allow us to explore new forms of expression of the Greek language and specific and highly diversified cultural features. The class is open to students with proficiency in Greek, at least at an intermediary level. Open to Undergraduates with professor approval. A. Bresson. Winter.

CLAS 44916. The Discovery of Paganism. (=CDIN 40301, ARTH 40310, LACS 40301, KNOW 40301, HIST 64202, HREL 40301, ANCM 44916) How do we know what we know about ancient religions? Historians of religion often begin by turning to texts: either sacred texts, or, in the absence of such scriptures, descriptions of belief and practice by observers from outside the faith. Archaeologists focus their attention on the spaces and traces of religious practice—or at least those that survive—while art historians begin by examining images of deities and religious rites. Yet we often fail to see the extent to which the questions which we ask of all of these diverse sources are conditioned by Christian rhetoric about pagan worship. In this course, we compare two moments when Christians encountered "pagans." During the initial Christian construction of a discourse on paganism (and, more broadly, a discourse on religion) during the late Roman empire and during the Spanish discovery of the New World. Our course examines silences and absences in the textual and material records, as well as the divergences between texts and objects, in order to further our understanding of ancient religious practice. We will begin to see the many ways in which, as scholars of religion, we are in effect still Christian theologians, paving the way for new approaches to the study of ancient religion. C. Ando. and C. Brittenham. Spring.

CLAS 45116. Patronage and Culture in Renaissance Italy and Her Neighbors I. (=HIST 81503, KNOW 41402) A two-quarter research seminar; the first quarter may be taken separately as a colloquium with the instructor's permission. The great works of literature, philosophy, art, architecture, music, and science which the word "Renaissance" invokes were products of a complex system of patronage and heirarchy, in which local, personal, and international politics were as essential to innovation as ideas and movements. This course examines how historians of early modern Europe can strive to access, understand, and describe the web of heirarchy and inequality that bound the creative minds of Renaissance Europe to wealthy patrons, poor apprentices, distant princes, friends and rivals, women and servants, and the many other agents, almost invisible in written sources, who were vital to the production and transformation of culture. Grad students only; can be taken as a one-quarter colloquium with permission. A. Palmer. Autumn.

CLAS 45117. Patronage and Culture in Renaissance Italy and Her Neighbors II. (=HIST 81504, KNOW 41403) The second quarter is mainly for graduate students writing a seminar research paper. A. Palmer. Winter.

CLAS 46616. Reason and Religion (=CDIN 40201, KNOW 40201, HIST XXXXX, CHSS 4XXXX, PHIL 4XXXX, CHSS 4XXXX, DIV 4XXXX) The quarrel between reason and faith has a long history. The birth of Christianity was in the crucible of rationality. The ancient Greeks privileged this human capacity above all others, finding in reason the quality wherein man was closest to the gods, while the early Christians found this viewpoint antithetical to religious humility. As religion and its place in society have evolved throughout history, so have the standing of, and philosophical justification for, non-belief on rational grounds. This course will examine the intellectual and cultural history of arguments against religion in Western thought from antiquity to the present . Along the way, of course, we will also examine the assumptions bound up in the binary terms “religion” and “reason.” Consent required: Email sbartsch@uchicago.edu a few sentences describing your background and what you hope to get out of this seminar. S. Bartsch and R. Richards. Winter.

CLAS 47716. Exemplary Leaders: Livy, Plutarch, and Machiavelli. Cicero famously called history the “schoolmistress of life.” This course explores how ancient and early modern authors – in particular, Livy, Plutarch and Machiavelli – used the lives and actions of great individuals from the Greek and Roman past to establish models of political behavior for their own day and for posterity. Such figures include Solon, Lycurgus, Alexander, Romulus, Brutus, Camillus, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, Julius Caesar, and Augustus. We will consider how their actions are submitted to praise or blame, presented as examples for imitation or avoidance, and examine how the comparisons and contrasts established among the different historical individuals allow new models and norms to emerge. No one figure can provide a definitive model. Illustrious individuals help define values even when we mere mortals cannot aspire to reach their level of virtue or depravity. Course open to undergraduates and graduate students. Readings will be in English. Students wishing to read Latin, Greek, or Italian will receive support from the professors. M. Lowrie and J. McCormick. Winter.

CLAS 48616. Hölderlin and the Greeks. (=GRMN 48616, CMLT 48616) The German poet Friedrich Hölderlin submitted to the paradoxical double-bind of Johann Joachim Winckelmann’s injunction that “the only way for us [Germans] to become great or – if this is possible – inimitable, is to imitate the ancients.” As he wrote in his short essay “The standpoint from which we should consider antiquity,” Hölderlin feared being crushed by the originary brilliance of his Greek models (as the Greeks themselves had been), and yet foresaw that modern European self-formation must endure the ordeal of its encounter with the Greek Other. The faculty of the imagination was instrumental to the mediated self-formation of this Bildung project, for imagination alone was capable of making Greece a living, vitalizing, presence on the page. Our seminar will therefore trace the work of poetic imagination in Hölderlin’s texts: the spatiality and mediality of the written and printed page, and their relation to the temporal rhythms of lived experience. All texts will be read in English translation, but a reading knowledge of German and/or Greek would be desirable. M. Payne and C. Wild. Autumn.

CLAS 48916. The Formation of the Modern Concept of History. (=SCTH 51302) The seminar aims to investigate the formation of the modern concept of History (from the end of the 18th to the end of the 19th century), mainly in Germany and in France. Dealing with intellectual history, it will concentrate first on the great topos of the historia magistra vitea (History mistress of life), its questioning and finally its dissolution with the emergence of a modern concept of time and a new understanding of what is History. Time becomes an actor and history is understood in the singular as History and progress (die Geschichte in German). The period of the French Revolution will, then, play a capital role, both at a real and symbolic level, in France and beyond. The seminar will also follow the emergence and the progressive advent of the modern regime of historicity, even if expressions of resistance and even denial of it (through Restauration, Reaction, longing for an idealized past, etc.) were active and many  First required readings: Reinhart Koselleck, Futures Past; On the semantics of Historical Time, MIT 1985, François Hartog, Regimes of Historicity, Preentism and Experiences of Time, Columbia, 2015. 

F. Hartog and R. Pippen. Autumn.

CLAS 49000. Prospectus Workshop. A workshop for students who have completed coursework and qualifying exams. It aims to provide practical assistance and a collaborative environment for students preparing the dissertation prospectus. It will meet bi-weekly for two quarters. C. Faraone. Autumn. Winter.

Greek:

GREK 21116/31116. Herodotus. Herodotus has a well-deserved reputation as a great story teller. He broke new ground in his writing of a history of the world as he knew it in prose, while at the same time claiming the heritage of Homeric epic. While reading Herodotus will prove to be a pleasure in itself, it will also help aspiring Hellenists get the hang of the structural characteristics of Greek narrative prose. Readings will be primarily from book 1, with a selection of passages from the later books. Students are encouraged to read the full Histories in translation. H. DikAutumn.

GREK 21200/31200. Greek Philosophy. (=FNDL 21005, BIBL 2/31200) The Phaedrus is one of the most fascinating and compelling of Plato’s dialogues. Beginning with a playful treatment of the theme of erotic passion, it continues with a consideration of the nature of inspiration, love, and knowledge. The centerpiece is one the the most famous of the Platonic myths, the moving description of the charioteer and its allegory of the vision, fall, and incarnation of the soul. We will read the entire dialogue, with special attention the language and style, with a particular focus on religious and theological ideas. E. Asmis. Spring.

GREK 21300/31300. Greek Tragedy. This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama in general, seen through the special problems posed by one play. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed. E. Asmis. Winter.

GREK 23116/33116. Plato as a Socratic. The class will read Plato's Seventh Letter in Greek and relevant scholarship in English. J. Redfield. Winter.

GREK 24500/34500. Justin Martyr. (=BIBL 44500, FNDL 24504, BIBL 41801) It is probably safe to say that Justin Martyr was the first truly philosophic Christian theologian, unless one gives the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews that distinction. This course will focus on a careful reading of the Greek text of the First Apology and (as time permits) the Second Apology, with attention to Justin's language and literary style. We will also concentrate on Justin as an early defender of and advocate for the Christian faith, the importance of his logos doctrine, his demonology, and his sacramental ideas and theology of worship. D. Martinez. Spring.

GREK 24916/34916. Greek Epigraphy: Private and Public Inscriptions of the Greek City-States(=NELC 44916, CLAS 44816, HIST 50303) Greek inscriptions provide us a unique and specific approach to the ancient Greek world. This class will investigate both private and public inscriptions of the ancient Greek city states, from the Archaic to the Imperial period. It will allow us to explore new forms of expression of the Greek language and specific and highly diversified cultural features. The class is open to students with proficiency in Greek, at least at an intermediary level. Open to Undergraduates with professor approval. A. Bresson. Winter.

GREK 25116/35116. Reading Greek Literature in the Papyri (=BIBL 36916, HCHR 36916) The earliest—and often the only—witnesses for Greek literary works are the papyri. This makes their testimony of great importance for literary history and interpretation, but that testimony does not come without problems. In this course we will cover some of the concepts and techniques needed to recover the literary treasure contained in this highly complex material: from the history of book forms, the textual tradition of literary works, and the creation of the canons to more philological aspects such as editorial practice, Textkritik and paleography. Our literary corpus will include biblical texts, paraliterary (school and magical) texts, and translations of Egyptian texts into Greek. We will work with photographs of the papyri, and every part of the course will be based on practice. As appropriate we will also work with the University of Chicago’s collections of papyri. Requirements: at least two years of Greek.       S. Toralles. Autumn.

GREK 41916. Sem: The Iliad through its Characters. (=GREK 26716) Aristotle praises the Iliad for its cohesive plot, but in many ways the epic is driven not by plot but by character. In this seminar we will explore the varied presentations of heroic (and non-heroic) character in the Iliad by reading great stretches of the poem, with a particular focus on speeches and non-verbal communication. Through this lens we will engage the epic’s central themes, including mortality, relations with the divine, and conceptions of the polis, as well as questions of the poem's unity, composition, and poetics. E. Austin. Spring.

Latin:

LATN 21100/31100. Roman Elegy. This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona. D. Wray. Autumn.

LATN 21200/31200. Roman Novel/Philosophical Prose: Cicero, De re publica. (=FNDL 21203) The object of the course is to learn what Cicero understood the project of political theory to be and to explore a number of the contexts in which his work has been read. To this end, we will explore some of the traditions on which Cicero drew, read the entirety of the fragments of the Republic, and engage the work of a number of its readers, both ancient and modern. C. Ando. Spring.

LATN 21300/31300. Vergil. This course will survey the main interpretive issues surrounding Vergil's Aeneid through a selection of readings from books 1-12. You will also be required to read the entire epic in English translation. Class time will be given to translation of the Latin, discussion of the secondary readings, and attention to the epic’s larger themes and meanings in the literary and cultural context of Augustan Rome. S. Bartsch. Winter.

LATN 26000/36000. Latin Paleography. The course will emphasize the development of Latin handwriting, primarily as book scripts, from its origins to the waning of the Carolingian minuscule, ca. A.D. 1100. By mastering the foundational types of writing, the students will develop skills for reading all Latin-based scripts, including those used for vernacular languages and the subsequent Gothics and their derivatives down to the sixteenth century. M. Allen. Winter.

LATN 32800. Survey of Latin Literature I (Poetry). We shall read extended selections from prose writers of recognized importance to the Latin tradition. Our sampling of texts will emphasize writers of the Late Republic and Early Principate. D. Wray. Spring.

LATN 32700. Survey of Latin Literature-I: Prose. Substantial selections are read from Cato, Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Seneca, and Tacitus at a rapid pace, with attention paid to their use of resources of the Latin languge and their role in the development of Latin style. P. White. Autumn.

LATN 34400. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students’ awareness of the classical artists’ skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. M. Allen. Winter.

LATN 46016. Senecan Tragedy. (=TAPS 46016) In this course we will read all of Seneca's eight genuine surviving tragedies in translation and several in the original, together with major scholarship on the plays and related issues. Special focus will be given to the relationship between Seneca's dramatic poems and Stoic philosophy. D. Wray. Spring.

LATN 48116. Cicero Orator. (=BIBL 48116) Cicero’s culminating essay on oratory is compared with Aristotle’s Rhetoric, other rhetorical writings by Cicero, and some of the speeches with the aim of identifying distinctive preoccupations of Latin oratory at the end of the Republic. Topics considered include the influence of philosophy on rhetoric, practice versus theory, teleology in the history of Roman oratory, the construction of Roman auctoritas, and the relation of live performance to publication. P. White. Autumn.

Ancient Mediterranean World:

ANCM 30400. Who Were the Greeks? (=HIST 20701/30701, CLAS 30400, CLCV 20400) If the current resurgence of interest in ethnic studies is a direct reflection of a contemporary upsurge in ethnic conflict throughout the world, it remains the case that notions of peoplehood and belonging have been of periodic importance throughout history. This course will study the various expressions of Greek identity within shifting political, social, and cultural contexts from prehistory to the present day, though with a strong emphasis on classical antiquity. Particular attention will be given to theoretical issues such as anthropological definitions of ethnicity, the difference between ethnic and cultural identities, methods for studying ethnicity in historical societies, and the intersection of ethnicity with politics. J. Hall. Autumn.

ANCM 30722. Iranian Political Culture II. (NEHC 20722/30722) The second of a two-part seminar examining the emergence and evolution of the Iranian Empire in late antiquity. From its inception, Ērānšahr was conceived in relation to its Roman, Central Asian, and South Asian neighbors, and inter-imperial interactions structured the subsequent development of its society, culture, political economy, and imperial infrastructure. The seminar will center on the role of war, diplomacy, trade, and cultural exchange between Iran and its neighbors in the shaping of its political culture. R. Payne.

ANCM 34306. Byzantine Empire: 330–610. (=CLCV 24306, CLAS 34306, HIST 31701) A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the formation of early Byzantine government, society, and culture. Although a survey of event and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. There will be some discussion of relevant archaeology and topography. No prerequisite. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. W. Kaegi. Autumn.

ANCM 34307. Byzantine Empire: 610–1025. (=HIST 21702/31702, CLAS 34307, CLCV 24307, NEHC 21702/31702) A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principle developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of event and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. No prerequisite. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. Graduate students may register for grade of R (audit) or P (Pass) instead of a letter grade, except for History graduate students taking this as a required course. W. Kaegi. Winter.

ANCM 3XXXX. The Athenian Empire. The Athenian Empire (477–404 BCE) is one of the most iconic empires of the past. Thucydides is famously a major source on Athen’s fifth century empire, the history of which is supposed to be well known. But how did the empire really work? Considerable new material has accumulated over the last decade. It allows us to revisit old debates but literarily also to create new fields of investigation. The Athenian Empire should not anymorebe analyzed in a purely political dimension. It should also be read as a religious, social, financial and even economic construct. A comparativeanalysis with other imperial constructions is also much needed. This class will make use of a large body of literary, epigraphic, archaeological andnumismatic sources. For all ancient Greek texts a translation will be provided, although the documents will also be available in original language. A. Bresson. Winter

ANCM 37416. Curses and Cursing in the Ancient Mediterranean World. (=HREL 47416) We will survey the evidence for cursing in the Ancient Mediterranean World, beginning briefly in Mesopotamia and Egypt, then focusing mainly on the circum-Mediterranean basin from the archaic period down until Late-Antiquity. These rituals will include the conditional self-curses attached to oath, revenge curses, binding-curses (defixiones), prayers for justice, “voodoo dolls” and erotic curses used for seduction. Some knowledge of Greek and Latin recommended. C. Faraone. Spring.

ANCM 43516. Ancient Mediterranean Environments and Landscapes. This seminar examines the interplay between conceptions and analyses of Mediterranean environments and landscapes, from the beginnings of classical scholarship to the present. Key themes include: environmental determinism, human and non-human interactions, interpretive approaches to space and place, the role of science in archaeological and historical practice, and the compartmentalization of “environment” and “landscape” as analytic focus. These themes loom large now - during what might be called the “environmental turn” of the controversial Anthropocene in the humanities and social sciences - and their intensifying resonance provides the basis for critical reflection of the discipline’s past and future trends. K. Kearns. Spring.

ANCM 45516. State and Society under the Ptolemies. (=NELC 45516, HIST 70407) Recent research encourages a reexamination of the classical opposition between pre-modern and modern states. As traditionally defined, the key difference would be the inability of a pre-modern state to exercise in-depth control of society. Being unable to develop a significant bureaucratic apparatus, a pre-modern state could have only achieved a weak control of the people it administered. To a certain extent, the opposition still has some validity, but the alleged “weakness” of pre-modern states, for instance in terms of capacity for extraction of revenue, should be revisited. Thanks to the sources available, the Ptolemaic possessions (by which one will understand not only Egypt but all the other territories under Ptolemaic control, from Asia Minor to Syria and from Cyrene to Cyprus) provide an ideal case study to test these concepts. We will examine written documents in their original languages, but translations will also be provided, which will allow students who do not control the ancient languages to also participate in the seminar. A. Bresson & B. Muhs. Autumn, Winter.