Undergraduate Courses, 2012-2013

Classical Civilization (CLCV)

20700–20800–20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I, II, III. (=HIST 16700–16800–16900) Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter, Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn, Winter; or Winter, Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. For course description, see History. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

21200. History and Theory of Drama I. (=CLAS 31200, CMLT 20500/30500, ENGL 13800/31000, TAPS 28400) May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. For course description, see English Language and Literature. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended. D. Bevington / H. Coleman. Autumn.

21812. Greek Art and Archaeology I: From the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars. (=ARTH 14307) This course will survey the art and archaeology of the ancient Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (480 BC). We will study early civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, and their dramatic collapse in the twelfth century BC. We will then see the emergence of a new political and social system based on city-states, featuring distinctive forms of sculpture, architecture, pottery, and urban design. Along the way, students will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life. The big question is: how can we make sense of the past by means of artifacts? R. Neer. Autumn.

Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. This course is the first of a two-course sequence; registration in the second course is not required for participation in the first.

21813. Greek Art and Archaeology II: From the Persian Wars to the Coming of Rome. (=ARTH 14407) This course will survey the art and archaeology of the ancient Greek world from the Persian Wars (480 BC) to the rise of Rome (ca. 1st century BC). Major themes will include the place of Greece within a larger Near Eastern and Mediterranean context; the relation of art and empire; the cultural dynamics of ethnic strife; and the relation of art to philosophy. Along the way, students will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life. The big question is: how can we make sense of the past by means of artifacts? R. Neer. Winter.

Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. This course is the second of a two-course sequence; registration in the first course is not required for participation in the second.

22412. The Rituals of Empire: Religion and Diplomacy in Republican Rome (=HIST, BIBL) Religious ritual and sentiment played an important role in the evolving relations between Rome and the polities of the Hellenistic world. Through an examination of literary and epigraphic sources, we will explore the ways that religious ideology and practice were implicated in Rome’s diplomacy and the development of its empire. We will also attend to questions concerning the relationship between religious authority and political power more broadly. L. Masri. Spring.

22700. History of Philosophy I: Ancient Philosophy. (=PHIL 25000) This is a course in Ancient Greek Philosophy. We will study major works by Plato and Aristotle, ones that introduced the philosophical questions we struggle with to this day: What are the goals of a life well-lived? Why should we have friends? How do we explain weakness of will? What makes living things different from nonliving things? What is the difference between knowledge and belief? What is definition and what is capable of being defined? A. Callard. Autumn.

23510. Plato’s Republic. (=FNDL 22704) A close reading of what is arguably the greatest work of philosophy in the Western tradition. We will probably pay particular attention to the relationship between philosophy and ruling, as well as to Platonic psychology, but this will be a discussion class and so the overall direction will be shaped by the questions that students bring to the text. For that reason participants are strongly encouraged to read the text beforehand; we will be using the C.D.C. Reeve edition. J. Thakkar. Autumn.

23712. Aquinas on God, Being and Evil. (=FNDL 20700) This course considers sections from Saint Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica. Among the topics considered are whether God exists; the relationship between God, existence, and the real; and the origin and nature of evil.

24812. The Historical Context of the Platonic Dialogues. (=SCTH 31923, CLAS 34812) Plato’s historical fictions, like most such work, use the past as a way of confronting with current issues. This course will place them in the context of the history of philosophy and the development of prose literature, at a time when colloquial prose was new and philosophy was a highly contested term, overlapping with religion. Final paper. J. Redfield. Winter.

25107. Empire and Enlightenment. (=CLAS 35107, HIST 20502/30502) The European Enlightenment was a formative period in the development of modern historiography. It was also an age in which the expansionist impulse of European monarchies came under intense philosophical scrutiny on moral, religious, cultural, and economic grounds. We chart a course through these debates by focusing in the first instance on histories of Rome by William Robertson and Edward Gibbon, as well as writing on law and historical method by Giambattista Vico. C. Ando and R. Lerner. Winter.

25510. Homer’s Odyssey. (=FNDL 21901) Prerequisite(s): Required of new Fundamentals majors; open to others with consent of instructor. This course is a close reading of the Odyssey. Discussion topics include identity, maturation, hospitality and friendship, gender, travel, and fantasies about other cultures. Texts in English. W. Olmsted. Autumn.

25512. Plato’s Philebus. (=PHIL 2/35705, CLAS 35512, FNDL) PQ: History of Philosophy I. This class will be a close reading of Plato’s Philebus. We will divide our attention between the problem of unity in multiplicity—of what it is for an individual to belong to a general class—that structures the first part of the dialogue, and the problem of the nature and value of pleasure that dominates the second half. We will, in the end, try to think about the dialogue as a whole, and how these two problems might be connected. A. Callard. Winter.

25700–25800–25900. Ancient Empires I, II, III. (=NEHC 20011–20012–20013) Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Near Eastern History and Civilization). Autumn, Winter, Spring.

25700. Ancient Empires I: The Neo-Assyrian Empire. (=NEHC 20011) G. Emberling. Autumn.

25800. Ancient Empires II: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. (=NEHC 20012) Winter.

25900. Ancient Empires III: The Roman Empire. (=NEHC 20013) Spring.

25912. The Presocratics. (=PHIL 21314/31414, CLAS 35912) This is an advanced survey course on the Presocratics. The figures covered will include but will not be limited to Thales, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Anaxagoras, Empedocles, and the Atomists. The focus will be primarily on issues of metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy, though other topics will be discussed as they arise. C. Frey. Spring.

26312. Death and Society in the Roman Empire. (=CLAS 36312). Roman cemeteries from all over the empire were a reflection of Roman society and have been studied as such. In this course we will trace how Romans of all classes used their tombs to project a social persona of themselves and their families, how changing burial customs reflect social and cultural change, and how salient differences in burial customs between various Roman provinces can studied in a historically meaningful way. E. Mayer. Autumn.

26508. Economy and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome. (=HIST 2/31005, CLAS 36508) In this course we will explore not only the nature of ancient Greek and Roman economies, but also the way in which social and political structures constrained or facilitated the efforts of individuals to devise successful strategies within those economies. We will consider trade, manufacture, and agriculture, and we will devote considerable attention to issues of methodology: what questions should we ask about ancient economic life, and with what evidence can we answer them? C. Hawkins. Spring.

26512. Augustine’s Confessions. (=FNDL 24713) Augustine’s Confessions recount not only his own conversion(s), but seek to facilitate a conversion in his readers and, thereby, inaugurate a new form of meditative reading. Like Cicero’s Hortensius, the text which prompted his long return to God, they thus belong to a genre of discourse known as protreptic in antiquity and designed to turn the reader towards the pursuit of wisdom. Of course, the Confessions as a confession participate in a number of other genres, and, thus, our analysis will have to take into account its generic complexity in order to understand how seeks to be read. Christopher Wild. Spring.

26912. Septuagint Greek. (=CLAS 36912) This course is aimed at students who have a working knowledge of Greek Grammar. The course will provide an overview of both the linguistic aspects of the language of the Greek Old Testament, and the social and literary context within which the text was produced. We will cover text-critical questions; the general phenomenon of “translation Greek” and the specific processes of translation of the LXX; subsequent translations of the text; textual transmission from the papyrus codex to the medieval witnesses; particularities of the Greek language in Egypt; and the history of the society that produced the translation, the Jewish community of Alexandria. Close reading will focus on the Pentateuch, with select passages from other books. S. Torallas, Spring.

27112. Ancient Metaphysics. (=PHIL2/31503, CLAS 37112) In this course we shall study some of the very different accounts of the world developed by the ancient Greek philosophers. In particular we shall consider the following Aristotle’s ontology of form and matter, actuality and potentiality; Epicurean atomism; the Stoic strange combination of rationalism and through going physicalism of all-pervading pneuma; Platonic theories of a transcendent realm. E. Emilsson. Autumn.

27212. Jews and Christians in Egypt. (=CLAS 37212) This course will be taught with texts in translation and does not require any knowledge of Greek. It will begin by covering the history of the Jews in Egypt from the earliest Elephantine garrison to the scarce evidence for their survival beyond the reign of Hadrian. Drawing on literary and documentary texts from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, we will approach topics such as political representation, legal issues, animal sacrifice and onomastics and identity. We will then turn to the earliest stage of Christianity in Egypt, with special focus on the birth of monasticism, again drawing on literary and documentary texts. S. Torallas, Spring.

27612. Greece/China. (=CMLT 2/34903) This class will explore three sets of paired authors from ancient China and Greece: Herodotus/Sima Qian; Plato/Confucius; Homer/Book of Songs. Topics will include genre, authorship, style, cultural identity, and translation, as well as the historical practice of Greece/China comparative work. T. Chin. Spring.

27812. Thucydides, Machiavelli, Carl Schmitt: Three Masters of Political Realism (=SCTH 20692/30692, CLAS 37812) This course is devoted to the origin and development of political realism as it is exemplified in the works of the ancient Greek historian Thucydides, the Renaissance Italian politician and political philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli and the twentieth century German legal philosopher and constitutional theorist Carl Schmitt.
In the course we will first examine Thucydides’ notion of history and his view of the relation between political communities, based on fear and a fragile balance of power. We will then study Machiavelli’s idea that politics is the most serious matter and therefore statesmen as well as political philosophers should base their actions and observations on what is, and not on what ought to be. Finally, we will investigate Schmitt’s notion of “the political” as the relation between friend and foe.
Required readings:

  • Thucydides, The History of the Peloponnesian War, trans. R. Warner (New York: Penguin, 2010)
  • L. Strauss, “On Thucydides’ War of the Peloponnesians and the Athenians” in The City and Man (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978), chapter 3
  • N. Machiavelli, The Prince, trans. H. C. Mansfield (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998, 2nd edition)
  • Q. Skinner, Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001)
  • C. Schmitt, The Concept of the Political, trans. G. Schwab, expanded edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007)
  • H. Meier, The Lesson of Carl Schmitt: Four Chapters on the Distinction between Political Theology and Political Philosophy, expanded edition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011)

This is an undergrad course, open to grads with consent. G. Giorgini. Autumn.

27909. Visual Culture of Rome and its Empire. (=CLAS 37909, ARTH 26910/36910) This general survey of Roman material culture will use the archaeological evidence complementary to literary sources in order to delineate the development of Roman society from the Early Republic down to the first sacking of Rome in 410 CE. Urban planning, public monuments, political imagery, and the visual world of Roman cities, houses and tombs will be discussed in relationship to the political and social processes that shaped their formal development. E. Mayer, Autumn.

28512. Medicine, Magic and Scientific Thought in Ancient and Medieval Europe. (=HIST 25209, HIPS 25209). This course will survey the early history of Western medicine as it intersects with what we might label as religion and magic. From Pythagoras to Galen, and sleep incubation to healing amulets, we will explore how the ancients understood disease, what cures were theoretically available to them, and how healing practices could function in a socio-political capacity as well as practical. As we move from the ancient world into the early Medieval age, we will encounter the further complexities added by Christian orthodoxy, covering such topics as the healing cults of martyrs and alchemy in Medieval monasteries. The class will conclude with a consideration of some historiographical problems posed by the lasting influence of such work as Frazer’s Golden Bough. E. Jeck. Autumn.

28300. Ephron Seminar. The goal of this annual seminar of changing context is to promote innovative course design. Examples of past topics are gender, death, violence, and law in the ancient world.

28609. Greek and Roman Historiography. (=HIST 20503/30503, CLAS 38609) This course will provide a survey of the most important historical writers of the Greek and Roman world. We will read extensive selections from their work in translation, and discuss both the development of historiography as a literary genre and the development of history as a discipline in the ancient world. Finally, we will consider the implications these findings hold for our ability to use the works of Greek and Roman historical writers in our own efforts to construct narratives of the past. C. Hawkins. Winter.

29100. Ancient Myth. This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29800. B.A. Paper Seminar. PQ: Fourth-year standing. This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their B.A. paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their B.A. papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the B.A. Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the B.A. paper and, therefore, is not reported until the B.A. paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the B.A. paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn Quarter or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters. Autumn, Winter.

Greek (GREK)

10100–10200–10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100–11200–11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100–20200–20300).

10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. Autumn.

10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 10100. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. Winter.

10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. PQ: GREK 10200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 10100–10200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

11100–11200–11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like GREK 10100–10200–10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100–20200–20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. Asmis. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: GREK 11100. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. PQ: GREK 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 11100–11200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100–20200–20300. Intermediate Greek I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. We read Plato’s text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. We will focus on translation of the Greek text and close reading of syntax and metrical analysis. We will also discuss Sophoclean language, dramatic technique, and tragedy in fifth-century Athens. S. Nooter. Spring.

20300. Intermediate Greek III: Homer. PQ: GREK 10300 or equivalent. Close reading of two books of the Iliad, with an emphasis on the language along with elements of Greek historical linguistics. J. Redfield. Winter.

Following the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100–20200–20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2012–13 will be offered again in 2015–16.

21712/31712. Hymns: Homeric and Hellenistic. PQ: GREK 20300 or equivalent. In this course we will read some of the greatest hits of Greek literary hymns. We will explore the Iliadic undertones of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, erotic power plays in the Homeric Hymn to Antigone, and the comedic buoyancy of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. We will then look at Callimachus’ take on hymns, and will inquire into the tensions of genre-bending and replication as he turns the Homeric into the Hellenistic. Through it all, we will seek to find the meaning and raison d’être of these hymns whose contexts elude us: are they sacred offerings to the gods or playful poetical events? S. Nooter. Spring.

21800/31800. Greek Epic: Apollonius. This course is a reading of Book 3 of the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. We consider character, story world, and the presence of the poet as we endeavor to understand what has become of epic poetry in the hands of its Hellenistic inheritors. M. Lowrie. Winter.

21900/31900. Greek Orators: Demosthenes, Isocrates. PQ: Two years or more of Greek. “With Isocrates, Greek artistic prose reached its technical perfection,” says L. R. Palmer in The Greek Language. Yet Isocrates has not found nearly so prominent a place in the university curriculum as have Demosthenes and Lysias. This course will attempt to give the great orator his due. We will start with his speech on Helen, comparing it with Gorgias’ famous Encomium. We will also read the ad Demonicum, which became something of a handbook in later Hellenistic and Roman-period schools, and the Panegyricus. We will consider carefully Isocratean language and diction, and why it has merited such sustained praise among connoisseurs of Greek prose style, ancient and modern. We will also emphasize the centrality of Isocrates’ contribution to Greek paideia. D. Martinez. Autumn.

25500/35500. Greek Religion. C. Faraone. Spring.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter.

Modern Greek (MOGK)

11200/30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. (=LGLN 11200) This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets. Winter.

Latin (LATN)

10100–10200–10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100–11200–11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100–20200–20300).

10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work. Autumn.

10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 10100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 10100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose. Texts in Latin. Winter.

10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III: Cicero. PQ: LATN 10200. After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200. Spring.

11100–11200–11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I, II, III. This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in fifteen weeks and is appropriate both as an accelerated introduction and also as a systematic grammar review for students who have previously studied Latin. Like LATN 10100–10200–10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100–20200–20300).

11100. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook. Classes are devoted to the presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises. Autumn.

11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: LATN 11100. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin. M. Allen. Winter.

11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: LATN 11200. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in LATN 11100–11200 by reading a continuous prose text such as a complete speech of Cicero. Our aim is familiarity with Latin idiom and sentence structure. Spring.

20100–20200–20300. Intermediate Latin I, II, III. This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

20100. Intermediate Latin I. PQ: LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent. Primary readings are drawn from Cicero’s orations on the conspiracy of Catiline in 63 BC, and are accompanied by background readings on the period. The purpose of the course is to consolidate the knowledge of Latin gained at the first-year level and to extend it. P. White. Autumn.

20200. Intermediate Latin II: Seneca. PQ: LATN 20100 or equivalent. Readings consist of a Senecan tragedy and selections from his prose letters and essays. Secondary readings on Rome in the Age of Nero and related topics are also assigned. Winter.

20300. Intermediate Latin III: Vergil’s Aeneid. PQ: LATN 20200 or equivalent. This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil’s language, versification, and literary art. Students also are required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation. M. Payne. Spring.

Following the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100–20200–20300), advanced courses are offered in a three-year cycle. For example, courses offered in 2012–13 will be offered again in 2015–16.

21800/31800. Roman Historiography: Tacitus. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. Primary readings are drawn from books 1 and 2 of the Histories, in which Tacitus describes a series of coups and revolts that made AD 69 the “Year of the Four Emperors”. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative. P. White. Winter.

22400/32400. Post-Vergilian Epic. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. Lucan. The goal of this course is threefold: 1. To read through some 2000 lines of the Bellum Civile in Latin; 2. To read all of the epic in English; 3. To explore the critical responses to this play in the 20th century. S. Bartsch. Autumn.

22600/32600. Roman Comedy. (=TAPS 28425) This course is a reading of a comic play by Plautus or Terence with discussion of original performance context and issues of genre, Roman comedy’s relation to Hellenistic New Comedy, and related questions. D. Wray. Spring.

23400/33400. Boethius Consolation of Philosophy. PQ: LATN 20300 or equivalent. The Consolation of Philosophy, which Boethius wrote in prison after a life of study and public service, offers a view on Roman politics and culture after Rome ceased to be an imperial capital. The Consolation is also a poignant testament from a man divided between Christianity and philosophy. About 70 pages of the text are read in Latin, and all of it in English. Secondary readings provide historical and religious context for the early sixth century AD. P. White. Autumn.

24712/35712. Latin Epigraphy. An introduction to the reading and editing of inscriptions in Latin and their use in historical study. We will give special attention to public documents of Italy, Spain and North Africa in stone and bronze, and to the history of the epigraphic habit within imperial and colonial political cultures. C. Ando. Spring.

25200/35200. Medieval Latin. (HIST 23207/33207) The Practice of Carolingian Saints’ Tales. Spoken ‘Lingua Romana rustica’ departed from canonical Ancient Latin long before the late eighth century. But at this time the renewed study of the Classics and grammar soon prompted scholars and poets to update the stories of their favorite saints, and to inscribe some for the first time. We shall examine examples of ninth-century Carolingian ‘réécriture’ and of tandem new hagiography in both prose and verse by authors such as Lupus of Ferrières, Marcward of Prüm, Wandalbert of Prüm, Hildegar of Meaux and Heiric of Auxerre. All source readings in Classical Latin adapted to new Carolingian purposes, which we shall also explore historically in their own right. M. Allen. Autumn.

26000/36000. Latin Paleography. (Newberry Library, Fridays 2–5). The course will emphasize the development of Latin handwriting, primarily as book scripts, from its origins to the waning of the Carolingian minuscule, ca. AD 1100. By mastering the foundational types of writing, the students will develop skills for reading all Latin-based scripts, including those used for vernacular languages and the subsequent Gothics and their derivatives down to the sixteenth century. M. Allen. Autumn.

29700. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

32700. Rapid Reading and Survey I. We shall read extended selections from prose writers of recognized importance to the Latin tradition. Our sampling of texts will emphasize writers of the Late Republic and Early Principate. E. Asmis. Winter.

32800. Rapid Reading and Survey II: Readings in the history of Latin literature. With emphasis on major trends in modern critical interpretations of the major figures. M. Lowrie. Spring.

34400. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, we combine regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. Our goal is to increase the students’ awareness of the classical artists’ skill and also their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. S. Bartsch. Autumn.